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Goat Talk
Goat Talk

Episode 7 · 1 year ago

Goat Talk Podcast 007 | Miguel Gomez Interview (12x Emmy Winner, Univision Reporter), TikTok, Sports

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In episode 007 of Goat Talk, Alonso Frias and Edgar Padilla are joined by Miguel Gomez, a 12 time Emmy Winner who is currently working for Univision as a reporter. They discuss Miguel commentating for ESPN, his success on TikTok, the life of a reporter from college to Univision, the Champions League, MLS, Youth Soccer, and other journalistic topics.

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What's up? Everybody's episode seven of goat talks and we have a special guest today. Emmy Award Twelve Times, twelve time, andmo or. What do you see on Jeneralis? We go, we go, go, man, how's it going, guys? Show or podcast? Sorry, it's cool, man. Thank you. I'm excited to be here. Man. I like talking sports, I like talking a little smack and yeah, for as far as wars Um. So I'm want to ask you how what got you into, you know, the whole journalism report? Well, yeah, man, it's so. I I grew up in Albuquerque, in New Mexico, breaking bad for those for the after those breaking bad fans. Great. Yeah, that's like the biggest export that we have in New Mexico. It's breaking bad. So I grew up there. On in seventh, sixth grade, when I entered Middle School, there was a TV production class and we would do live morning announcements. So in the morning you'd get like an excuse to get out of class, you know, for at least an hour, because you'd go work on the morning production and I would do the behind the scenes, I would do the camera, I would do what we call the technical director, which is putting a camera switch in the camera, putting the graphics, and then eventually, like I started being on camera and being the anchor and reading the news and all that stuff, and then they, because I was part of that club, they took us on like this TV tour of one of the local stations, and then I just saw everything and I was like this is so sick, like I want to do part some stuff like this. And throughout my middle school and high school I did a lot of like graphic design in terms of photoshop, and I would always do stupid videos with my friends, like we'd come up with stories that didn't even make sense, you know. We would do like this. No, no, we just try to get a fact. Yes, man, like we try to get effects. I remember one time I have a friend named Nester. We would just have them stand on the street and I pretend like he's getting run over and then record a car that's coming and then doing the effect of him getting run over. So just messing around with all that stuff kind of got me really good at editing, you know, and at writing and understanding like how to tell the story. And going into college I really wasn't like I didn't know what I was going to do. I was like man like, I was kind of like a bit on. decided on that first semester and for some reason I just went into like hey, I could do news, I like doing this, like telling stories, I like the visual aspect, and then I even took like one of those tests that tells you like what career you should do. Then I got either lawyer or journalist. Now I was like, okay, that's like another indication for it. So I went into it. But in school I went to the University of New Mexico and I didn't really learn anything, you know, like that. It's supposedly a good journalism the part, but I didn't really get anything out of it, like you said, you know, you said you went to San Francisco State and they do a lot of like newspaper writing and all that stuff, and it's not something that I was interested in, even though I went into broadcast journalism. Will do a lot of writing in English and I'm on the Spanish news reporter, you know, so I didn't even get to practice a lot of the Spanish and all that stuff. So I ended up having to get a second made. You're in Spanish, you know, just to kind of work on that Spanish as well. At the same time that I was doing the news, but even before I had even like decided for my major, I was working at a restaurant. I was working in it's called Gutsis kitchen. It's a new Mexican restaurant on Mexican, New Mexican. It's that style of food down there New Mexico, super good, delicious food. But anyway, so I was a buzz boy in wiping tables, you know, maybe, if I was lucky at take twenty bucks home as a tip, and one day I was like, you know what I'm I'm sick of this. I saw I would check the when you be on website to see if there was any jobs that I knew that I could kind of qualify for. Of course, if I ever saw like a reporter position there, I would have never applied because they would have never even considered me. I wasn't even in journalism school yet. And when they going through the positions, there was an editor position, like a video editor, you know, you cut like what they called the Boh, which is just video that goes on the news, and I was like I can do that, I can cut and I can edit. So I applied. What I did to stand out when I applied was I went to their website and I saw some posters that they had for the newscasts and events that they had, and they were very bad. They're like ugly. So it was like I could redesign these. I went on, redesigned them, went to Wal Greens, I printed them out and then I printed out a paper application. Think this was back like in two thousand and twelve or two thousand and thirteen, and I printed out the paper application as well as well as doing it online, and I shipped it into the hiring manager and I shipped it out on a Friday and on Monday I got a call because, I mean it stood out, you know, just throwing that in stood and I showed up to my to my interview. They they asked me for an interview. I go to the interview and it turns out that they posted the wrong position. It wasn't for video editor, it was actually for for radio. I was going to be doing promotions, which is like me being on the radio, like it can the towels Kya Laskina, Blah Blah Blah. You know, I take it and putting in the tent at the radio station called was called Jose seem posine, gone way and the Solis seen in going to nukasals, look at Atoka, you know, would be the sobody knows that Jose and would be like dumb. That is I love. My radio name was Milasso, because you have to pick a radio name.

Yeah, just be like an that Salo Miguel is. Had to be like you on that as so I can ask you know, like I course's and Ka. I got it pass. Well, it's about it. It was all Lila and you know, just talking smack and all that stuff. Yeah, I'm being and being there in that same building was the ESPN station, the NBN radio station, because I was going to just yet I noticed how you at the same time, like for a couple months, you were also commentating for ESPN for I believe was football. Right, it was for football and basketball. And how that happened. It was pretty funny because it was on the ESPN the Portez and it was a football season had started for the for the University of New Mexico, and we had the rights to it and we had to transmit it, but they didn't really know anyone that knew how the one that really understood the sport of football. They had a person that they had hired, but he was more like football, you know. And I'm a big football fan as well. I like all sports and a big Tan sports in general. So, in terms of football, I sat down and they told me, Hey, would you be interested in doing the commentating for this, the play by playoffs? Like hey then, that sounds Badass, you know, like I get to go on my weekends to the tailgates. You know, I show up in like a sue, you know, when then they give you like a buffet. You're at the press box. You had your own private press box, your press badge. I remember this like a three weeks before this, I was like wiping tables and then suddenly I'm like entering backstage with my press pass, you know, and I have my head set my own booth, you know. So it got it just happened like quick and I was like yeah, let's do it. And in terms of football, like it was fun, but, you know, reading a defense is difficult, reading an offense is difficult, calling in and understanding like the terms, you know, for example, like a tight end, a laser, Rada and it's when you're you know, quarterback, money style, example, and learning all these different nouns and, yeah, and understanding. So it's a lot of studying, you know. And then like the press kids that come for like sports are like this big and especially in football, you know how they throw like a statistic for everything. Yeah, that you gotta like be going and try to look for those statistics to point out throughout the game. Once like certain players hit certain goals, you got to put right down. So it's a lot of work. It took a lot of work and preparation because it was like a five hour show of just talking and talking and talking, and luckily I had a color commentator, so do the play by play and I had a color comitter. It was very animated. His name been coming and he's aid. He's a let, you know, and just beat tacking smack. He'd be like kind of like, you know, the light of it, and we just vibe off of each other and sometimes actually we got in trouble one time because we would just go off, you know, we just keep talking and we get and would be talking snack and we like that. There was a points that the University of Mexico would get blown out really bad and the game was so boring. So we have to find ways. You know, look how kind of like I tell you guys do your podcast, you know, you guys like talk a little smack, you know, kind of free float, and we started doing a little bit of that. But back in the day a lot of that stuff wasn't allowed. It was more likely. I'll see here is it's almost another party, you know, kind of like very professional. And from there I notice, you know, I'm like, I'm not a professional in this way, like you know, when they say fake news, that's when I think of Fake News, you know, when you're like kind of like not yourself on camera like could, because I always like would see people on like TV or the radio and the always try to act very like professional, professional. Then you see them up in them they're nothing like that and it just there's no, it's just not genuine, you know. So it was fun to be there and being that environment and even though we did contial, we honestly would not care a lot, you know, just talk snack left and right. And then after that that happened. I started doing commentating for basketball at well as well, but the University of New Mexico at the time for basketball was incredible at basketball and there's the arenas would get packed and basketball was a lot more fun than football because so in football I'm not a press box alone, you know, and I have my own booth, which sounds incredible, but you don't get the feel of the game, you know, when you you're there and the crowd and the smell of the grass, you know, the head's and everything. In football you get that, but through this, through the headset, and you're not control booth, which is good because, I mean sometimes it was very cold, you know. So we had that controlled environment. But once you go into basketball you're literally like in the like what was it? We were like third row, but it was like an elevated third row for the press and it was just like a huge table where like all the press people were and there we are in the middle of everyone. You know, the arena's really nice. You can get it's can look it up. It's called the pit in the University of New Mexico and it actually hosted a finals, four five championship back in the day. It's a really nice arena and it's a really loud arena. And it's a mile up. It's a mile because New Mexico's a mile up. Yeah, and then it's up and it's called the pit because it's actually on a hole on the ground. They dig the hole and it's so loud and it's just a great environment and you being there with your head so you can just feel it and you can see the crowd, you know, people interacting and being in that. That was incredible. I think that was out of the sports commentating that I got to do, that was the most fun that I had. When it was a in basketball. You but yeah, like you learned more like doing basketball, but since it was like a lot more fast paced compared a football like, you feel like you got more comfortable like speaking. Well,...

...for sure, because it's a lot more fast paced and they were good. So you know, when the team is good and they're scoring points, it's a lot easier to come and tate. And then also it's less difficult, you know, to comment take basketball and it is to come and take football. We were a lot closer to the action in football. I had like these binoculars sometimes because I needed to luckily, at a headset, you know, with so I didn't have to be holding a mic and I'd be having to look at the plays, you know, from line the scrimmage, with my binoculars and sometimes being able to call the players. And in the football at least throughout the season that I come into it, they wouldn't wear their player names in the backs. would be like looking at whole numbers and these are not. Yeah, so you I mean throughout the season you start recognizing the players, but we're talking about what like a fifty two men roster, so it's a lot of players that you have to learn, where as in basketball, you know, if anything, you maybe have to learn like eight consistent names, ten consistent names, and there's only a few on the court, you know. So it made it a lot easier and it was a lot more fun. And in terms of the production, we did have an engineer that would go with us. Was Two commentators in the engineer, but sometimes that engineer winning goes. So I learned how to do the broadcast, do the live broadcast and affordable device. You know, I got to learn a lot of the technical aspect. I would make. I wanted to make it, make it like super epic and since at the time I was also working at the radio station. We had all the equipment. So I would download like these mutes music beds and it would be like and then I would get a friends and narrated like loude ever see that the wo making coy you, you know, to do to Boa like the basketball effects and sounds, you know, as our introke, and then we got to pick our music that because it they just literally gave us a show there, like here you go, you guys, go and make it, and it could have just been of US talking, but I wanted to make it like with the sound, with the music, and I got to pick up the sound and for football I got more like a marching band song, but for Basketball I was like let's get a bump, and so it's like boom, boom, boom, boom bull and you would start like get on that summons, is that on you? And see that I don't know actual quit. I'm being this stuff at all. It all, but you know, you know what I mean. Like we just got to get more into the VIBE and you being in the middle of the crowd gets you more excited. You know, it's like if you're at a party or you're dancing home alone. I mean you could be dancing home alone and you'd be like, okay, you know, I'm buying but yeah, you're out in the party, you know are you're like really like a a going and you start going. So that's what it felt like to be with the actual crowd in the middle of their commentating the basketball. So I would say I learned in both, but I had the most fun in basketball because having that bade of control, did you feel like that was also like it like it improved your skills also, because, especially, like if you have like an editor, you have somebody who's guiding every step of the way. You can't really like give your persona out there or like exactly the play byplay commentator also as well. Exactly, man, it was. It was so much fun because you get to learn exactly how you have to produce it, and you didn't know. Of course we made errors here and there and we learned to to fix them and we would listen back to it and say, Hey, we could done this better, you know, and the fact that it was on us, we were the ones that had to fix it. So you had to figure out how to fix certain things, you know, and do the whole production and it made us more versatile as professionals because, and that's why, for example, young journalists usually start off in smaller markets, and in smaller markets you have to do everything you have to. You know, you don't have a producer, you and have an editor, you have you know a lot of things. So in smaller market you have to do everything, and it turns it shows you that versatility what because once you start getting to the bigger markets, you're realize that you might need it once in a while. You do have all this cushion and all these other professionals that are helping you around you that know what they're doing, but sometimes you do need to be a bit versatile. I'll give you a perfect example. Look what happened right now with the coronavirus, for example, like in late night talk shows. I remember when the coronavirus hit and the late night talk show hosts had to be doing this the on camera and they were so boring. And you look at Jimmy Fallon, you look at even at Trevor no and all these other guys, and they did it. They weren't versatile because it didn't even know what operate a camera or they didn't you know, they just kind of started with their Webcam and they needed the crowd to get that kind of interaction and there was none of that struggle because they're kind of just used to being in this bubble where everything is done for them, you know. Yeah, whereas and you look at like a for example, like a youtuber that can just go, you know, and make you and tell you a story, because they have to do everything, you know, and they were very entertained during this period of corona and you see them keep growing and I feel like that's the equivalent to, you know, to US professionals in the journalism world, in the sports world, where we have to do everything. It makes you very versatile, it gives you that creative control and let you make even more fun and creative decisions, you know, and it gives you more authority over your product, over the brand, over what you're trying to put out, and being able to produce a four hour show and understanding what goes into it really helped me out in a lot of areas in my life, worn even in sports, you know, I have to tell story. I got to feel a little bit more, understand a little bit more of the whole process so it was very fun, man. It was very fun because you got you got a lot of experience out of it and you were having an incredible time at the same time. You know, you're there in turn of watching basketball. You know, you're what we would are like a few hundred dollar tickets. You're getting that for free. Then you get backstage, you know, and then I didn't come into the front door. And again I was wiping tables a a few months before this when it came came to basketball season. And now here I...

...am walking into the pay you know, through the players tunnel, you know, coming out and with the sue, you know, our little badges, and then we would have like briefcases because that's where we would carry our equipment and then our documents and all that stuff. So I was like, I'm looking place strow, you know, where than and I wasn't even I didn't have a major at the time. I was still going to school. I was, I think, a freshman in in college while I was doing this, freshman and Sophomore in college, and I didn't hadn't even declared a major. I hadn't even taken any journalism class, none of this. And I'm already getting this experience and nineteen years old, which was you know, it was kind of like, damn, this is so sick that I get to do this. So it was a great experience as a young professional. And then from there, that's what led me to TV, because we need be sewn. Said Hey, well, you're already doing the sports. Would you mind doing like a one minute sports iment? Cant Call The me new to Lobo and Lobo because they're the University of New Mexico. Lobos. That's the mascot. So I would be the new to logo and I would do like a once a week, you know, highlights are happening football and soccer and basketball, in all the sports, and I would compile with different videos out that you know and say, like me, that's look at my Sol and even then, for those, I made my own graphics for them because I wanted it to be, you know, kind of different. And again it was this experience that I got, do mean the actual commentating, that I was like, Oh, I can produce this. I would like a little music on some areas, you know, certain interviews, and it would definitely get a different pace than what the traditional sports highlights are, which always found very boring because, yeah, imagine, man, you you like you get sports. Usually now they're a little bit more spret out, but it would like, for example, at least in that market, it was a lot of college sport. So they're all on the weekend. What do you do throughout the week? You know, just kind of put the video, okay, and then the low bows also on. All right, they lost to blah, blah, blah. You know, you got to have to put a little bit more, you know, a little production, a little bump in, a little music, and it got me to that area and they got that foot in the door for news for me. So it all kind of just it was that decision to apply to that position. That wasn't even that position, that was that editor position and it ended up being radio that got me, you know, all these opportunities, but it's kind of just kind of taking the chance to apply and saying, like, you know, I believe in myself, I can do this, and then doing something to stand out a little bit more from everyone else. That was a point to that same position. That probably because then they let it. Later told me that there was actually people that used to work in the radio that were very famous in New Mexico that had applied to that position, but since I was I took yes, since I took a little bit more of an initiative, and they saw that I wanted to do more journalism and it was more like this was something that I like to do. They took a chance on me, you know, so taking a chance on yourself maybe leads you down the rope or others to take chances on you. Yeah, because that's feel like it was like a story that is meant to be, like all that happened for a reason and ended up doing something that you really like and you really fit, like you really found your career to all this. Basically, yeah, man, it was a it was fun times, man, for sure. I wanted to ask you how, Um, so, what was like the process, like how would you practice, like, you know, obviously carry so like we see you. I was on your Tick Tock yesterday, and obviously Carus of the professional professional, but what was the process of like how do you practice? When you were starting off, like what was were you just like talking, just or starting like a like a you know that you like a like a script kind of or you know what I mean? Or Yeah, so remember I was telling you I started off in radio and doing the hostession to Sin Corn Rabbit, and that day that I got my interview, they're like, well, let's check out your voice. How do you speak Spanish? I cycle. I think like I could speak spact and ith. I was like, well, I was born in Mexico, was born quaities. I grew up in the US, but I was born in Mexico and we grew up speaking Spanish. Sounds like. I fought like Spaniard and I thought I was really good and they give me a script for a commercial that that they would run. It was like mbd express, all whether it's not DMB, it's the mbd over there it's backwards. It was for mbd express and they had me read it and I was like, I read it really fast. I thought I killed it, you know. I thought it was really good and they're like okay, it's good, and then later on I ended up replaying that thing and it was me reading it like I'll see has been at I endia, like, you know, like super nervous, super fast. I thought it was it was gonna sound good, but it wasn't. It wasn't good, but luckily while I was there, I had a really good people around me that would tell me, like first for radilar like talk, like if you're smiling, like I see as Companyeto's, you know, you got to show that enthusiasm, and they're like slow down a little bit, try to emphasize in these areas, you know. So what I got to practice when I was when I was doing those radio you know, because I would have to hop in and say, like it was up, guys, call it number five right now, get free tickets to a violated blah, Blah Blah. You know. So it was in those chances that I would get to practice and I would write a script, sometimes like for the radio, like boom boom boom, like some key points that I had to hit, you know, and then going into the football it was all this preparation. You know, it was writing those statistics, understanding what flow we were going to do of the show, you know, what things we were going to hit before and obviously reading them before and getting that kind of chemistry with that person that I was commentating with. and honestly,...

...all that was done on the job, you know, because it was such a small market, I was still going to school. I was having a full time job on top of doing this ESPN thing, you know, and I was very busy during that time period, so it wasn't like I could actually sit down to pract practice. It was yeah, it was sit down to do, you know, research on the game and all that stuff, and the actual practice came throughout the Games and I felt like as the season went on, we understood and we got a little bit more comfortable. You know, it was a little bit more like, instead of being a little bit more nervous, I guess, or a little bit like jumping into each other. We kind of started getting or cutting each other off. We started getting that blow and understanding where we were and it's all, you know, it is practice, but it was practice on the air, which was which was fun to do. I mean it was a little bit nervous to do because you don't have that experience at first, but jumping in feet first and that and that field, I feel like it was very interesting and that was my practice. Yeah, and I feel like they helped a lot because, say, like with radio, for example, or for a podcast like you don't have to worry about facial expressions, that people are looking at you. You won't only have to like focus on your voice. If you're setting that tempo, if you like, people can imagine what you're saying. Basically, you have to worry about what they're viewing, in a way, exactly exactly when. Sometimes we'd be it's funny because I told so in the football games there be a buffet up food but for all of the press, which was dope, and we'd be coming to the four file our shows so long. So We'd get hungry. So we'd be like eating over here, you know, and I wouldn't get my microphone as the other person was talking, and then it would be like boom, and then I'm like all true luck water, you know, like wouldn't I mean, as long as I was talking, you know, people wouldn't know that I was eating or doing all these other things. Or if my friend was like, I mean my colleague was saying something that like Oh me get it, tell us more about this last play, and I was like some place, I'd be lost, like I don't know what what they call like t there's not be like different. I could be like tell them like, you know, with your hands, are like, oh no, it's not it sound, you know, or point with things that, like, I wanted him like. Sometimes we have to do commercials and be been and I'd be like I've slide it in and be like read this, you know, and the same would happen to me. So you get to do a lot of things, you know, from behind the mic that you can do, for example, on camera, you know, and if I get nervous or lost, you know, or anything like that, it's a lot easier to save when you're unjust audio, you know, you could just keep talking and rambling a little bit, whereas in in camera, if you got lots, you know, and then that's when it starts getting a little bit embarrassing because everybody's watching you. Your se getting little bit nervous, whereas and over here you do focus, you know, a little bit, just your voice and down the line. That leads you to speak in better ways. You know, your tone, you get you get better at that. But for me it was difficult because then I had to make the transition to news and when I went to news they were telling me, hey, you sound a little too excited to be telling the news. You know, you've covered a murder here. Yeah, it's almost like a murder. Yeah, you gotta bring it down and luckily, when I was doing that time, I did have this this great news director at the time, Columbia the Golem, and those of who would stay with me after work and and work on my voice and tell me you see, you sound a little too high here. You know, try to comment down a little bit. But that was when I went into that news where I had to calm down a little bit more. And even then then, like I listened to how I was doing like my new stories, because you know, you have to do like kind of like tell a story. I've have that reporter voice. Yeah, and Shit and I wore I remember lie like listening to the ones, like even from like a year ago or two years ago. I like my voice is so different. I feel like, you know, your on air personality always changes. It keeps changing, you know, and it depends on the story and it depends on the pace and the story that you want to do. Sometimes I even catch myself like, damn, you sound really different today. You sound a little too happy today. You know, you got a comment down, you know, and it's kind of it's an ongoing process all the time, you know, and learning how to talk and learning what to say, you know, and it was. It was definitely that continuous practice. That keeps happening and today I feel like I still keep learning on things like how to say things or how to what tone of voice that she use for certain areas. But it's something that I would say that is something that's a little bit difficult to find that voice for you. You know that's going to work and some people kind of just get it right away and so for some it takes forever. But luckily there's a lot of technology now and a lot of phones and a lot of cameras in your face now that makes it a lot more comfortable. You know, you can go live now on facebook, you could go live now on Instagram, and for a lot of people it's not more comfortable. And then once they start going into this industry, that the path they're taking, it it's a lot easier because of all the technology. Just like you guys, you too are anchoring, you know, you two are presenting you to representers, you know, and if it comes if it comes down that, if they needed to put you, you know, in a scenario where you're like in the news or you're in TV or you're in a radio or in a podcast, in a different...

...podcast or something like that. You know how to add, you know how to Project Your Voice because you've had this practice resting before. You know, back in the day, they're we didn't have that many opportunity, especially, I feel, like journalism, and mostly like journal there's always going to be journalism, like there's always been news. But how do you see the progression now, especially with like sports reporting? You see it going more to social media, because I know a lot of people get like their sports news from twitter, like you have wows for basketball, you have fabricio for soccer transfers, you have Adam for football, and you see the market going more towards social media. Oh absolutely, man, because think about it, where do you spend more time? You know even that I work and news. I always tell them. You know, like I feel like the most important asset now is the digital asset, because it's not like even for sports, if let's say you know the dodgers are playing in the morning and the score result comes out, you know, whereas in before, it'd be like, and I'll tell you, if the dodgers want today at six, you're not going to wait till six. Might out if they want. Man, you know, you're just going to go online and look, look it up, you know, and one you could either Google it or too, you know, you could go to the journalist that you that you want, you know that you follow, you know. I know there's a sports page and EXTICO, one foot board, you know, and it grew up as a kind of like a mean page and now it's a professional, respected site. The same with bleacher report. You look at bleacher report, it was just a blog and it kept growing and it kept getting bigger and people start going to either these entities or the journalists that are covering these these areas. And I feel like the next area where you going to see something big is, for example, like in Tick Tock. You know, give me a quick, little digestible, you know, little nice produce video of all right, guys, so I'm coming with you with some of the highlights, you know, and I would want to consume that where it's like, give me a minute, what happened? Let's go, and I feel like that's going to be a lot more important than the actual like sports segments that we would see on TV. Of course, ESPN's always going to be there. Number One, you want to turn on to a ESPN. But there's these needs, niches. I don't know if I'm pronouncing that right, but these specific areas, you know, that you can deep dive into and you follow those journalists for that. You know, you have like your UFC guy that you go to. You're going to have your you know, your NFL, your mls, you know, your USL, you know, even for local leagues, and that that feel like that's already happening and it's going to continue to grow and it opens the opportunity, especially for a lot of young journalists that maybe are like, you know, when you apply to a job and they're like, Oh yeah, well, we need someone with ten years experience, and you're like, Oh my God, when am I going to get that? You know, and you're like yeah, exactly. You're coming out of college, you know, and you need like ten years experience, and you're like how do I do that? Well, that ex well, that experience can come from, you know, creating your own your own product. And then sometimes, and I'm I think we're going to start seeing that, it's going to out grow what you were trying to apply for. You know, like you could create it to you know, to the millions. If you're really passionate about it and you keep doing it and you keep that consistency with it, you know you're going to grow beyond you know and you're going to get the following, you're going to get the respect, because I feel like credibility concum from working for a company, but you can also earned that credibility by being consistent and by producing good material. And if I see, for example, like if I see like Edgar has, like you know, keeps updating on, you know, the on the Champions League, and I say okay, and then I see him next game like Oh, giving me some like youthful information. You know, that is in good context, well produced, okay, and I keep seeing that, will guess what, at some point, if I keep seeing it, I'm going to click follow. And what I want to get something, you know, out of my Champions League. When I want to get that commentary, which I am that guy, I do go on Youtube and I do listen to commentary on sports afterwards, and they might be boring to some, but I like to listen, you know, from people that like the dog, you know, at one good example is a pat mccaffy podcast. I love listening to it. You know, I hop on and that's where I get my nfl fixed from, you know, whereas and before would be, you know, going to watch first take, which is another one. You know, I guess it's good. It's commentating, but it's part of the ESPN atmosphere where Pat, you know, he started off on his own and now he has his own production company, his own podcast and this whole thing, you know. So it would be the same. For example, if I know that edgars is producing these this great content, I'm gonna follow him, you know, and that's going to make him and give him credibility in my eyes, because he's been consistent with it. But he's been putting out good material, you know, consistent material and information that is hugeful, content that is useful, and I'm going to follow him. That's going to be my Champions League blogger, you know, because somebody like, oh, more like also more from house of highlights on of he's one who started at all and then he ended up now he works for Sports Center on ESPN. So those people who are like breaking those barriers and starting off something small and it gets bought out by like a larger company. Yeah, and that's the thing too. You can even sell it, you know, and make your millions and keep working, and then you already have that credibility. Look, Oh, I'm the creator of, you know, Spain entity. And now you get to go to these companies like sports center, where you get a couple mill a year, you know, to talk about sports, which is you growing into that position rather than waiting for, you...

...know, going up that little corporate ladder. That, I feel, is what we used to get sold, you know, before, and now we find out that, you know, you really needed, specially with other things that there are online, and even for those wanting to go into broadcasting sports, you know, or you might not have the rights to the NFL to to elaborate or transmit the Games on your on your channel, but you could give that commentary. You can create a show, a sports show, around those sports that are happening, and you can do it at home. You could be nineteen, you could be eighteen, seventeen, fifteen, you don't have to go to college. You can pick up whatever you need to learn online. You know us if you want to, how so, you can find it on Youtube, you know you can. You can find anything on how to do always because, yeah, anything man like Beca think about it like, Oh man, I like I would like to produce this, make this little like sports show, but I don't even know how to do graphics. I don't even know what equipment I need. Hey, you guys, well, what cameras do I need to blog my house boom, how to set up lighting in my house? You're going to find it, how to create graphics for my and you're going to find a tutorial for it. And if you're willing to hustle and you're willing to understand and take the time to read, it's not like saying hey, don't go to you know, like I'm saying, for me, college was a waste of time, but I was doing something better, you know, I was looking outside and I was actually doing it, and for me that's why I was a wasted time. Maybe for others it wasn't that, because they might need that structure. But if you're willing to hustle outside of it and find, you know, they are, is where you can grow and you can do you know, you could actually just create a product and say, you know what, screw you, College. Are already learned what I what I needed to do, and this is me doing this, this is me creating this, and especially now on platforms for like Tick Tock, were very easy and they're very liberal with their likes, you know, and people it's a very like community based platform where people are very supportive and if they see that you're hustling. You see that a lot with the businesses, and if they see that you're hustland and you're putting out that you're being consistent with it, you're going to grow that following and then you could take that following, let's say, to your youtube channel or to your podcast. I'd say for like, for example, you guys, you could be doing something consistent with it on Tick Tock and then say hey, by the way, guys can follow me on my instagram. I'm giving you more highlights there, you know, and people that are interested, obviously, and know that you're focused on it are going to follow you and that's how you start growing those areas and you realize, hey, you know, I was going to go work at like a tiny market in o Disa, Texas, you know, in the middle of nowhere in West Texas, and B a sports commented or over there for High School Sports, when my dream is to come and tate on the NFL, because what now? You can do that now. You can do that if you find an area and you find a way to be original about it and create useful content. You can skip all of that. Obviously, it's going to be a lot more work. Why? Because the money is not going to be coming in right so that's why it's going to have to be a passion. You have to find a way that you can be doing those or managing both. Or even if you're waiting, for you know, for a position open where somewhehere you want to apply, you can keep doing these things. You know, if you're like man, I really want to work in as a commentator for the NFL, but I don't have the money to go to school. I have to be working, I have to be helping my family. I'm pretty sure one day out of the week find time to create that content and make it and be in that industry while not being in it. And there's a lot of access for people to do it. Just a matter of actually sitting down, learning what you need to do, understanding what you need to do, being knowledgeable of what you're going to put on on air, which you're going to put out on your camera and doing the research, and I feel like in that area people are going to start growing and it's going to start getting easier for others to enter these things. And you know, especially in in this communications where everybody's doing this now. You know, everybody's doing video, everybody knows how to do this. You know there's a lot more areas for people to jump in and you're not going to need ESPN's or the ABC's or CBS, and I covered the sports of the world. You if you want to do it, you can do it. Yeah, because something also want to talk about, like I like, like something I find like like annoying in a way to us how like a lot of retired athletes are getting into, like are getting into the field of like commentating especially. So I feel like that they would like since they've been athletes their whole life. I feel like that about this bias of like rooting for a certain team or defending a certain promotion, a certain entity and then, compared to somebody's like coming out of college or somebody starting out their own thing, like they taking these jobs from them and I feel like they don't even do like the same job exactly so, and you and you see that a lot and and again, going back to that example where you see Jimmy Fallon and tribal not knowing what to do when they're on their camera, on their own, these big athletes come straight into the studio, which takes opportunities from guys like you and I, you know, that went into school, that that had those opportunities and they have that name behind them, that name, brand recognition. For example, like Tony Romo going to cebs, you know, and commentating over somebody that's probably been doing it his whole life and been waiting thirty years to get that position and suddenly Sonny Romo retires and he gets the twenty five million dollar contract right on the prime time. You know right away, because I was a name in yeah, like we got a got a nasty contract, and I get it. You know he's good, he has brain number recognition.

But the way that we we counter that is by doing exactly like, for example, what you're doing right now. You know, you're growing your brand in your area in the way that you can do it and your's more specific and you're going to have obviously more talent in this area than some professional athlete that's been focusing their entire life. You know, you know, you understand a technical aspect, you're growing in this area, but you know, in a lot of cases maybe people don't have the demo to show that you know whereas you you do and you're growing that brand, you're going that recognition and you know and for you you might have your own internal biases, but they're not as obvious and more pass might be more leaned, more leaned into listening to you rather than listening to, for example, Tony Romo. If you're like, if you hate the cowboys, you know you're being automatically prone to zone in the mount and alternative. Look, there's a lot of with his you know, NFL take. I'd rather listen it to him. You know. So I feel like that's the way that we can counter it. But I do think it's not fair. I do see more athletes getting on TV and getting those good contracts and even a new Nie be shown. I saw that the other day. You know, you have bombomb somewhere ano in, yeah, in contact with it Orto, and then they have that. I don't seem like yeah, Julian, he later pull it exactly man exactly and he's only going on a pulley culdup fort you and eat in this in if you even like. It's not even like his whole career is acting. And if you see his takes on soccer and stuff like, you're like, dude, like you like they you could tell, like to a person who watches sports like often you could tell, like he doesn't fit in, or like what he says doesn't make sense, stuff like that. Exactly exactly, and there might be someone that actually knows how to do it. But it's you know, they're putting that name in because of the recognition, and I'm not a fan of that. I'm not a fan of that. I mean if he if, I mean there's nothing wrong with giving him a chance. You put them on there and you're like, Damn, there's do noses football. You know, the Dude knows his basketball. I can you know. Then it's a little bit you know, but I feel like they bypass that interview process, you know, by just using their name and going on there and in some every because there it is very useful in terms of commentary. So so in terms of like, for example, when they put the football coaches and they tell me. Oh Yeah, you know, like this is how this play went and we're trying to break it down and it gives you useful insight. But sometimes they want they're like in the charisma or they're lacking, you know, in some other areas. But they always do get that on fair advantage. And I feel like the more we go on, you know, you do have these this like hyper popularity that's happening now with social media, and they're going to come with that brand name recognition that a lot of companies are going to try to stick to because there, because of social media, it's moving so fast and companies are getting a little bit left behind in terms of that. Their audience are they're going to try to pull his names and bring them into boost their recognition up a bit. So it's unfortunate, but I do think that's something that's going to continue happening. I wanted to ask you. I seen that. I seen our I want to read. Tick talks like the process of like how you make a story, but for people I don't know what's like. The process like every day or everywhere, whenever you like report like sometimes going on. Is it that you like, do you call some of they call you, Hey, this is up, or you know, I mean like Oh, say somebody just died like in front of your house or, I don't know, like in San Francisco or something right, Hey, we go somebody? Do Somebody call you, Hey, can you go do a report on this? or or what's the process like? Yeah, so it depends. So, for example, at my station I don't need to shown fourteen. Here in the bay area we're very clear on when we cover and we don't cover like a lot of crime or all that stuff. We do a lot of community based story power our community and that's what we want to do. I've definitely weren't the news test where it's all blood. You know, it's all blood. That's all they ask for. But here we have that opportunity, but it does come with the challenges. So how do you get a community story? I'll give you an example of something that happened this week. I got an interview with with a man that came out of the hospital. He had been in a coma for five months. He had been in a ventilator for a while and I was there for the moment that he first saw his family after five months. After have being there for because of the coronavirus, family members weren't allowed to go visit him, you know, and he wanted to share his story about what happened. So how did I get that story? I met when I was in the mission in San Francisco, about five months before I did an interview with this lady. I was going through businesses and I saw a lady that was there and I started talking to him and she told me that her brother in law had the coronavirus. So I told her, Hey, do you mind if I get your number and I keep in contact with you to see how how he's doing? It's like yeah, of course, and throughout the summer I have it written down on my phone, on my notes on my phone and sometimes, you know, even a reminder like hey, check up on this lady in four months. Hey said you're series sent me a reminder in four months to check up on, you know, on Tony or at all, selly or whoever the person's going to be, and you save their name with a good context on the contact. That what you don't forget. You know. It's like here. The ladies name was out selly and I put out of Cellie. Met In the mission. Her brotherinlaw has coronavirus,...

...you know, and it makes it easier to find my contact that way, and I checked up on her in the summer and she's like, well, he's still in the hospital. I was like Hey, this is my cell phone, let me know what happens is a few months passed by and I get a call from her and said telling me like hey, they my brother inlaw came out. He's coming out of the hospital. If you want to be there to capture that moment, it's like perfect. So this one story that I took out this week, I planted the seed for this story five months ago. Yeah, you know. And and that has to be a continuous thing that you have to be doing continuously to get those stories, because it's a reporter. You do have to come into the newscast with your stories. It's not like you get there and they're like hey, Migel, here you go, here's your assignment. You know, I've been in newscasts in new stations where it used to work like that, but then you find out that you end up covering stories that don't really matter or kind of like hey, you know. So when you come in with your new stories, you get to do more useful content and at times you get to do things that you like as well, you know, and you get to put a little bit of that passion. Like for me, I love sports and if I can throw in, for example, this week I did a boxing story and I personalized it with the coronavirus and how professional athletes have been effective, you know, and how businesses and jams are not recovering from it. So my pitch, if imagine, if I just went to my news director I was like, I got this boxer, he has a base bite coming up and I want to do a story on them. That's not newsworthy in their eyes, right. So you have to find a way to sell the story. And I'm talking to the guys like Hey, so how you've been affected? Man, I have to get a job. On a professional fighter. He tells me I'm a professional boxer and I have to get a job and there's no gyms to train. So for me it was difficult. My Gym close down and I have to find another gym that was willing to let me in alone in the gym by not charging me membership and not violating the county rules, you know. So that's a story right there on how businesses and people themselves and athletes have to go around it. So that's the story that they would have never assigned me, a sports story, and I have to find a way to make it a story and sell it to the producers. So once I do have a story, we have a meeting in the mornings where we meet up with our executive producer, with the producer of the show. The producers are shows, the one that goes and puts everything in order and figures out, okay, this is story is going to go here, this story is going to go here. They're in charge of the news. Guys. Are Not my boss, but they're in charge of the news caus they tell me in terms of times they are for my stories and all that stuff. So I say, you know, I have three stories today. This one about this boxer in the coronavirus. There's also the air quality that we could go through. We could speak to a couple of doctors that we have or we could do it in a we can also do this coronavirus story on stores and how businesses are being affected. You know, you have to come in with your stories and then they tell you, okay, well, I like the one with the businesses. They tell you. So you're like okay, you hang up on on your call and you ideally try to have the stories ready prepared before you go in, but it's difficult a lot of the time. So, for example, if they're like out of nowhere, they're like, oh well, we like all your stories, but today's story is actually different, where we want to focus more on the business inside. So, you know, it's something that I had deserves nothing prepared for. So it's making a lot of calls like Oh y, don't you pull, I'll let me l do it be shown. They obviously played us when I was just when I said a Cornsto, you know. So making those calls and getting getting with the people and understand home music, what's going to call, and getting getting with the people and creating the story. Sometimes you kind of have to do it on the fly, which is it can get very intense sometimes because as a journalist, I do everything. I'm a video journalist, so I write and edit, I shoe, I drive myself, you know. So it can be a handful to do everything, but they're there are ways to do it. Yeah, okay, and and also, as I wanted to know. Um, I mean, you don't have to tell me, but like for Tick Tock, because obviously it's a smaller you know, you have to condense everything into a smaller segment kind of thing, you know, like in the video. Um, is it harder for you to make that or is it easier? Oh, it's a lot easier, man, it's a lot easier. So when I've been I started this past few weeks making some tick tocks about my process to show a little bit of what I do kind of behind the scenes. And the way that I do that is I'm very conscious as I'm going through my day and I know that I have to shoot certain pieces. That way it makes it easier. I think of it as a sequence of how I'm going to do it. So, for example, let's say if I'm going to do today on how of what my day is, you know, I'll be like, okay, in the morning I have to shoot a video of me brushing my teeth, and then in the afternoon when you're there, you you know, as you're making breakfast, make sure you get five seconds of yourself in the breakfast, you know, and then after that get five seconds of yourself. You know sitting down in the computer, you know, and I'm very conscious of that. And then once I get I go, I shoot those little things throughout my day and then once it's time to sit down and, for example, write my story. I write my story, said it to the newscast and then after that, what I do is I just sit down and I put the videos all together, boop, in that order that I shot them, drop them in, sit down, open a word document and say, okay, here I am eating. This is a story of how I was eating serial this morning and the milk was bad, you know, and I go throughout that process and I start writing it with the video that I have. Oh, and...

...then I went and I sat down to my computer and I have the video of me sitting down to my computer. I write to my video. So and instance, it's only a minute long, you know, and you use, you have to use like certain like popular sounds for some, you know, so you don't have to really worry about the audio and it's a lot more quicker. I don't produce them as much as I could. I can definitely spend more time in them, but for me, since it's just a fun thing to do and to show up behind the scenes. For me, it's kind of I think about it like that. You know, it's a whole process throughout the day of, you know, being conscious that I have to record myself recording something, you know, as I'm doing certain things and I'm like, okay, this would be a good shot of me recording this, you know, and I'm conscious of that. or I should put the camera here and now you're going to be walking with your tripod. Come back get the camera. said it on the era the area to make that fool thing that you're walking with your tripe on and stuff. So it's a whole process throughout the day. I have to keep doing yeah, and I feel like, especially with tick talk, like a guys that audience said doesn't have like that attention span of watching a five minute, even a five minute like new segment. They want to they want to see like in thirty second and comments and they like what you do. To like the behind the scenes is like really important because I feel like a lot of people don't know like how a news story like editor just asked, like how's The new story produced? Like how does that whole process being a lot of people like that's interesting to them like all they seeing is just like the reporter on TV, like talk about the story, but they don't know all the behind the scenes, all the equipment, everything like that. And I feel like tick tock does a really good job of allowing you to showcase that. It allows you to showcase that behind the scenes and show a little bit of that process, because a lot of people thought I was with a photographer all the time and that I just sat down, step back and you know how here I am ready. No, you know, we're blue collar workers. We're out there in the sun, we're out there in the hazardous conditions. We're out there and I want to show you. You know, what it takes. You know, and sometimes, for example, you might be like, and this is something that we get a lot, for example, when you beat, you and gets a lot of grief like, Oh, you guys, tell my mom that are pods give me cancer, and you can all that. That's something I'm gonna tell you to. I'm going to all that. He's the only guy still a reporter, and they get like a lot of flag for that, like Oh, like being on your phone. Yeah, like you're gonna die some or something like that. And and I get why, because I grew up not being know and I grew up. I remember my mom throw away my Yu Gil cards because she saw an not a whole. We will that they were from the devil. Actually made me give them away friend because we saw that, and it's like I get that and I get where it comes from, but we've transition from that already, you know. And if those are our national in news guests, I'm doing local news, like how can I be faked give you fake news when I'm covering a community story? You know where it's in the community that I live, and I think that's why it's important to be in the areas that you are. You know. But you also showed them behind the scenes, you know, and you show we try to do a lot of process talking. So, for example, this week I was I we sent a request to the FBI for an interview and they said no, and we usually just say we sent a request to the FBI and they said no, but instead I recorded myself actually typing, you know, and telling you know, like we reached out to the FBI five times or six times, you know, and you explain to the people and you have the process talking that I'm not like hey, we tried, is just these people don't want to talk to us, you know, and I feel like that's who how you get rid of a lot of those, you know, old ideas, you know, and you also have to we give our audience a lot of credit. We gotta think of our audience that they're very smart. You can't say like who, Hey, these are going to give you cancer. You know, if I'm going to tell you, and I have proved that these give you cancer, then I'm going to do a story on it, one hundred percent. But I gotta tell you why. I can't just say, like, it's those on concert Mei study. Yeah, blah, blah, blah. You know, she's there in the couch. Just show her all they had these giving cancer. No, that's not the that's not a story. I got to talk to a professional. Tell me why. How did these work? In what time does it is it that it gives you cancer? And you know, and if I put enough points, you know, to prove to you that I'm making a good point, and that's my job to do that. I got to convince you that that's a good story, because I spoken to the top professional. This is not meal telling you, Hey, these give you cancer. You know, this is the top doctor, you know in the US telling you this. You know, this is not migue all the journalist. This is a guy that dedicated his entire life to do this and if he's telling you that, I feel like that gives that story credibility. That's something that maybe used to lack before and we have to find and get better at understanding and finding those sources and explaining to the audience who why something is dangerous, you know, instead of just putting fear, you know, of just putting fear. And there's definitely, you know, a lot of journals that's still right like that. I'm not that. Yeah, yeah, there are very old school. The Nimal sister seem hen as all our months. You know. It's like, dude, no, come on. You know, I used to work at a new at a newscast before were they would that would just want to talk about blood. It was just, you know, if it that old saying, you know, if it bleeds it leads. Yeah, I feel like that's where that's where we start losing our audience and then we start complaining like Oh, you know, like a lot of Latinos already radicalized or like in to not go culture. Well, yeah, that's all we're covering, that's all we're giving them in content, you know, that's what we're telling them. It's happening in their community, where there's other things actually happening in their community. I remember one time they sent me to I have this really cool story already for air for attemp'm newscasts, and they called me and this wasn't here, I don't need see on. This was at a different...

...station. They called me like at nine forty something. They're like, Hey, we need you to go cover this car accident. It's big. I was like, I'm this really good story known on us because we need we need to open with breaking news, and that's breaking news. I get there. It was like a little fender bender and worthy yeah, in the middle of the highway. I and I'm like why is this news? But they wanted to open with that red banner, you know, to get people like hey, there we have breaking news, horrible accident, and they go up to me and kid you not as I'm on air. I'm like I see as he pusting on cleal, but because she also Una for something, Sona, and you looking behind me and you see the cars just like get in their cars and drive away, and literally that's me on are. I'm like, well, it's it's all taking care of reporting, like you go, go, Mas, you long, and then I went off from my producer. Afterwards. I'm like this is not journalism. What are we doing here? I'm covering two cars and I'm getting people are and thinking like hey, there's breaking news happening in your community with just a little thunderbender. Yeah, happens all the time. And I had this really cool story that would have empowered, that would have helped, that would have given our resources, and we didn't air that because you want to know, open with that red banner, you know. So you do get a lot of that and that's a lot where you get the these get me are pots. That gives those people that idea that that's what we cover, and I feel like giving them transparency through tick tuck and showing you as well, like hey, this is what I did today, you know, this is what my day look like. It's going to stop eradicating those ideas, you know, it's going to get rid of that and I feel like as we go along, you know, I feel like it's going to be more important for journalists, even broadcast or sports journalist, to show their process behind the scenes, to show people, and I feel like that that's to your credibility. Yeah, because I feel like a lot of people, like it kind of gets me mass sometimes to how people say, like, Oh, this story is fake, this do the just just because he's a journalist, he can write whatever he wants. They don't know like a ghost, like an editor in chief. It goes through copy editor, it goes through like the sports editor, and then from there they could have a fact checker. Like it gets. It goes through so many filters that to even get published, and I feel like a lot of people don't know that to like Oh, you're just a journalist and he's just putting it out there, but it goes to so many things to get fact checked and like, unlike certain stories, they have to have a certain amount of sources, like I remember in college, like we had to have at least three sources or else wouldn't turn in the assignment to give it like even more credibility. So I feel like a lot of people don't know that. Like you talking to people, like you said, like you're getting those codes from doctors about the air pods giving cancer, like you're giving actual like people with credibility, like doctors in the field and stuff like that. And especially if it's going to be such an alarming thing like are pods get cancer, you have to have someone that tells you. I can't just say that because I heard it or because even if my even if like my theo, got cancer from are pots. I can't just give you that example because of my personal experience. Gotta get someone to back it up. And, like you say, we do have a process. Every day in my new my script, it's I can record my script. My executive producer checks at every day and, guess what, there's error. Sometimes, yes, send it in she's like, Hey, you said that it was a hundred and woldlob hundred and thirteen. It was actually a hundred and forty five. Oh shoot a thank you. I appreciate that. Good catch, you know, because you are going to miss in certain areas and we are on that deadline, you know, so sometimes you do miss. It's so it does need a filter. Did this story go ahead and not something also, I was going to ask you like a lot of trouble? Well, something I had like with deadlines, like I always stress me out like out of have like three or four headlines at a time and I'll be like really stressed out. And then for you, I was gonna asked, like how are you with their lines, especially since like you were going live? Are you say you have to send in stuff like that same day, like you get stressed out by that, or are you really good like time management? I feel like I've gotten a really good with time management, but I feel like that's for journalists, at least the ones that I've worked with, that's their biggest, biggest struggle, time management, and I've gotten luckily, I've been doing this for almost, you know, a decade, that I've gotten better at it and I've Gone I've gotten better at it by messing up, by by missing bedlines, by my story not airing, by me taking a decision that made or, for example, I was at a Bernie Sanders Rally and he my news cast was stead eleven and he got there laid and he was still talking my ten fifteen and they needed me to to make a produced package. And that day I was with the photographer and I was covering and the photographers like I'm not going to have time to day and I was like Nah, I gotta listen to a Bernie Sanders says. So I would stay there till the rally was over. was like till thirty and we had thirty minutes to write, edit and send and set up a live shot for that. Guess what, we didn't make it. And that was the story of the day and we missed it and the next day and my producer got in trouble, I got in trouble and my photographer got in trouble and and my news directors like, you know, this can't happen, you know, but this needs to air. We ended up airing but we ended up hearing like an eleven twenty when the newscast is almost over and people are not watching anymore. When that was the story of day and that was my responsibility and and the new director made a good point. He's like you went to a Bernie Sanders rally. He gives these rallies, these exact same rallies everywhere. You knew he wasn't going to say anything controversial and I think different, because it's a rally. They say the same things and things every time. Why did you need to stay there for so long. You need to set your deadlines and I feel like...

...that will that one story was informant because I got my colleagues in trouble and I took responsibility for it, but they still got in trouble and I think that was a great learning experience for me where I was like, I gotta set my deadlines and for me I go in out fifteen and my news cast at at six PM. So my deadline every day when I send out an email, my deadline two pm and I always on my emails time sensitive, always up on the top and I said Hey, thank you so much, I appreciated my deadline is two PM, even like a push untill three thirty. I give everyone at two PM deadline and I try to have everything in in terms of recorded and my interviews done and everything by two PM. That's my deadline and then I sit down to write and edit and I have a good chunk amount of time to actually do the the production. And sometimes it does get pushed that. The line does get pushed like till thirty and I have to do a luminter be a little bit later on, and you can do that, but if you consistently keep yourself two PM. I have to have everything in and that's my goal. You know, every day I have to get in everything by two PM and I have to have everything edited by five PM, because there's errors, man the bunch. Yeah, anology, as great as it is, it freaking s sometimes and you're going to fuck up. You're in in areas where you're like, you know, like technology, pure free this and you have an at work. Since my deadline is by PM to edit, I have that hour of cushion. Resident I see sometimes some reporters trying to add things, you know, towards the last minute and then you see they miss their their deadline on air and you're like of course they did. You know, they're trying to do a little too much, you know, and I try to do a little too much before five pm, after five PM and I still haven't done my story edited. It's like to the point, boom, boom. And sometimes, you know, you get to a story and a producer one S A, I want you to do a too minute package and you're like that's not feasible. Some reports are like okay, and then they are struggling there for you know, and they miss their deadline. And they get in trouble, whereas and they tell me that, I'm like, I cannot give you a package, I want to do a straight live. I'll be from there. I'll give you the information, I'll send some video that is not produced. I'll just send some video over you guys play it over me, as I'm talking live, and sometimes you have to make those executive decisions out on the field in order to make air, whereas in it might not be as good as a produce package. But I can give you all the details live. I know them. So I'll be like, hey, there's a fire, it's a three alarm fire, there's three injured. firefires. They're still going through it, you know, and I don't have to go through the whole process of like this morning in oak putting the fire, there was three. You know, that's extended to that. President, you know, if I don't have my deadline and if I don't have the time, I'll just stand up there and tell you what's happening. So you have to make those decisions and you have to be very conscious about it and set your internal deadlines for yourself. That has been something that I've been doing for the for the past I mean for four years maybe, and I have not missed a single deadline. I have not missed one time a deadline, and that was because I myself and that Bernie Sanders Rally and it was a bad mistake and it was on me and you learn from that. And you know how they always say, you know, there's always it's always good to make mistakes, and I made my mistakes and I learned from them and ever since I was like, okay, that's not going to happen again. Boom, two PM, five PM, and I've lived through that and I've not missed it. That mine because something too I wanted to ask you, like how do you manage like your social media, like I feel like you're pretty big right now. On Tick Tock you have over a hundred K followers, you have two million likes. There's been videos of yours, of Gonnen, like two million views. Like you manage in like Oh, this today, I have to do a tick tock to like keep the audience, or do you just do you have a schedule for tick tock or not? Really, I try to put them after work. So I try to. Luckily for me it's a lot easier for me because my job is to create content. As it is, it was hard. You don't have the great contents for the for the newscast. So I can just tell you my process throughout the day, which makes it a lot easier. But you do see that with a lot of other people, for examply feel with construction workers. Or there's this guy that does like from cold stone creamery. He's like has like two million followers on Tick Tock and all he does is him creating, you know, ice cream for his videos on from a peal V perspective, and that's him going through his process. You know, he could very easily wait and then do that when he's at home, but then imagine you get home from work and then you still have to create it where he's creating on the go and showing what you do. So for me it's created on as I'm going, like I said earlier. You know, you go and you shoot in that sequence and then as soon as I'm done editing my story, I just laid all in my timeline on my editing software. Who can go through it right it real quick and try to pose. So I try to post usually after work. But then it's also, like you know, is this is the very repetitive. I've noticed like some some of the stories. I'm like, okay, they're starting to look a little bit repetitive. Let's go back to the drawing board. What can we do when you got to keep changing that up here and there, you know, to make it different? And then, like one of the things, one of the one of those videos that perform well was people who kept asking me, you know, on the comments, like why do reporters just go like this forever? You know, where are they always nodding? What do they take forever to respond? Yeah, I see that one. And if because like they don't know, there's nothing to say about that. Isn't the L yeah, there's a delay on the backpacks that we use, you know. And that day I didn't really have an interesting story to tell and, you know, like Hey, this is what I did today. You know. Instead I focused it on that. Why do we take forever to respond? This is why, you know, and you switch it up in those areas, you know, and you answer those questions and then you go through the...

...comments and you see, okay, oh well, why don't you use a discord account instead, or why don't you use a phone instead? You know, and maybe I can make a video about that in the future. Like I was asked, you know why? Why don't we just use a cell phone? You go live? And here's the reason we do. We use so our backpacks, use like all the all the data cards from temobile, spray, Verizon. We go through all the networks, all the networks combines, so we actually have a stronger signal than what you do on your facetime. Is just the way that technology works that we have to feed it out. There are certain rules that we need for feeding it out. For ECC, you know, there's different areas that we have to think about, but you know, you can't really explain and maybe those are the behind the scenes that you can explain, and that's how you can create a content. You know, think about it, and created and posted. Right. Are you going to pursue like tick tock, more like is this? It's been like a market that's really just gone really well for people, yet they're getting paid through tick tock. But then there's also that thing where even like those supposed to happen today, where people weren't going to be able to download the APP today, but then he got I think you got to postpone like a week and then like in two months going to be like prominently bands. Are you going to like keep on pursuing that at a larger scale, or he's going to mainly focus on reporting? I feel like this is a great opportunity because a lot of people, you know, are being more associated with you. So you're able to, you know, show him a little bit of entertaining content. Op here some news, you know, a little bit of entertaining content. Here's some news, and keep informing them. So I very I like it a lot because when you VCON, if you think about it, I have, you know, the parents on the Nev shown and then I have the kids on ticket. That's something and and there and I can comments like Hey, I seen you on TV. If my grandma always watches you, my grandma loved you. Will Guess what? You know? Not only not, your grandma knows you, but now you know me too. And Yeah, passing by and if you're passing by the living room, you know and then you see that I'm on screen. Are you here? My Boys? You're probably going to stop and watch my new story. You know, because I am I see local those schools even think talk you know. So it's very helpful in those areas and it's helped me get stories as well. You know, I was out doing an interview and this I really needed an outside worker and this lady, she was a little bit shy, and then the kid was like, Oh, you to colo school, I think talk. I'm ask now as little as little and she he helped me convinced. It's the mom you know, because a lot of people take tock, they don't want to do interviews, like especially like when I've gone like in my experiences, when a lot of people don't want to be like on camera stuff like that. That really helps being like having a familiar face on tick tock and they know you're worth exactly yeah, and annoying me, and I think it's a very import important platform. I really do like it because it's very fun, it's quick to the point, you know, and you can show a lot in a minute and if I need to add more, I could just do another one later. You know, you can go live on the platform and I do think I ii it's something that I do find very interesting. I do find it very fun and very useful for what I do and for anybody. I feel like you can start a business and use it and promote your business through there and tell a story. Storytelling is going to is incorporated into, you know, our DNA. As as humans, you know, we've been telling stories since the beginning of time through rocks and carving, you know, in caves, and this is another way that we're doing you know, we're learning how to tell stories of our generation and it's going to help us be more divers as as well. You know, like I don't know how your story, I don't know know story, but if you guys start telling me, you know, through this platform, like hey, you know what you know, when I was a kid, I went through this and this is what I've been doing now, and I started this nonprofit, you know, and you give me that behind the scenes where I could just see, like, you know, edgars on profit, you know, and I would not be interested in it. But if you tell me that behind the scenes, you know why it matters to you that storytelling. It's very important and I do feel that a lot of people are going to start finding out how important it is and that platforms going to keep growing. Terms of the you know, of it being banned and stuff, I do think it's very political. For sure. It's a very political area. It turns out it Oracle and Walmart did get their deal approved by president trump. So we're going to have to see what happens. You know, I do think that the platforms not going to go away. I do think that it is going to stick around. I feel like the same way. So I feel like a lot of people because it I feel like. And then they also said Tick Tock. Also said that they were going to take they'll take it apart, they said, and I know they have a lot of money behind them and I know, I don't know, fret of like slap lawsuits were like large companies will keep on putting more and more money into the into the case and they'll keep postponing court dates. So the don't I feel like they'll just keep throwing money at it until either one of the two sides decides to just drop the case. Yeah, that's something that they could definitely do and it's probably going to happen and if it does get to that point, but it feels like the bald got approve for it. So luckily, hopefully it sticks around. I know that, for example, like there's instagram reals which I find trash. I don't like it. How many this is, like you just copyings, like yeah, just like you're kindly and and I feel like every person that gets into like tick tock ends up liking it because it's so it's literally for you, you know. You have your for you page and it's you know, it picks up exactly and why you like, your interest and it's very personal, lied to your liking, and you get a mix of everything. You know, you can get a sad story and then next...

I could get a sports story, you know, and then next I could get, you know, a reporter telling you how his day is and how it works, you know, and then next you get up NASA engineer creating a giant nerve gun, you know, and shooting his nephews with it. So and you only get it, you know, for a minute. And if I don't like it, guess what? Boom next. Yeah, boom next, you know. So it's a very you know, it's a very engaging platform and especially you know. So do you think for the upcoming year, I think it's going to be very important. Do you think, as far as, because you know, how we're saying, like everything is like tick times, like a minute long, right, or shorter or whatever, because I was telling Alonzo how like I think it would be better to get more content out like shoot, like, for example, like short clips or like we make tick tock or something, you know what I mean, because people's attention span, it isn't like that. I felt like they don't want to sit through a hour long or two hour long or three hour you know what I mean. So I think if we could just like short clips or something, you know, like this all condesce into some small I think people would like that way more. Yeah, and that's the beauty of Tick Tock. You get, you get a minute to tell your story and that's you know, that's your deadline. You get one minute, you know. That's it, you know, and if you have to get your point across through that and that that makes you get more to the point as well. But then it also makes great a challenge for you, because you need to grab that attention and punch him in the face immediately, you know, like they scroll and boom. You got to get their face because if you don't, if you're like just sitting back and smiling, that's what's going to happen to the next problem. You know. So makes you be a lot more intentional and to the point and it makes you be a little bit more creative in the sense of how am I going to grab that person's attention immediately, as soon as they see me, you know, and creating that short content. You know, I know it gives you a minute, but I don't even try to go a minute sometimes because even then, I know, unless it's very interesting, I've got to keep it to around thirty seconds, Forty five seconds, you know, because at the end of the day, they algorithm. You also got to think about the algorithm and how it works in the read words that watch time, you know. So if I have a minute long video but people only watch it for around thirty seconds, what's that going to do to my to my algorithm? What's that going to do to my views? You know, what's that going to do to the people that could potentially see it? You know, whereas in, for example, if I have a story that I know, you know, I could probably do a minute and the probably look a lot cooler, but it wouldn't be as interesting if I just did it as thirty seconds. I could do this in thirty seconds, then let's do it in the seconds, because I think people are going to appreciate that more and I feel like we've noticed that on take to pay, the like and fall of a part two. You know, I know that was a trend back in May and now people hate it. You know, people want you get it in. Yeah, I want yeah, I don't want to know till wait till next week to see if you traded that little bucket of sand for a tesla. You know. Oh, yeah, I want to know now. You know, get it to the point. Like I like just to see people call you. I thought you look like the Latino David Dobrick. I seen that all. Somebody comment. I get told that, yeah, you're the log hair that. Well, no, no, actually cut that yesterday. Look at them and but I've got that one. I got like some guy named scissors, I think. I think he's like some streamer. I've gotten, you know, if a couple soccer players from America. You know, I've gotten multiples man. Pretty funny, because something else I wanted to ask to about, like your Emmy. So, like what pushes you so say? Like maybe when you win your first Emmy, like it felt like amazing, even when you probably won your ten, like, but what pushes you now, like is it a Pulitzer? Is that like your next goal, or what is like? What are you working towards now in terms of like recognition and awards? I just like reading good content. Man. At the end of the day, it felt them. It felt really cool winning my first, my first STAMI. It was awesome being at the ceremony and then hearing your name. And then that first one that I want. I wanted with a with a photographer that I worked with and he was a good friend of mine, and just seeing his excitement was awesome because I got me pumped because he had he had been nominated multiple times and you have never won. He had never won and that was his first emi as well, and that was my first IMI, but that was like his fifth try or something like that at it. So seeing how much he wanted it got me pumped for it, you know. And then my first ceremony I took two awards and I was so excited there. Why? I like I had those things and like blue to my hands and it was awesome. But then, as time goes on, you realize kind of just sit there, you know, after that they just sit there and I'm not. I'll tell you this. I'm not entering anymore Emmy Awards. I'm done with that. I have twelve and I have I gave one to my mom, my brother, and then the other ten are in the floor in my living room, you know, in my bedroom, actually, I'm a house, you know, and they're just there. My Mike, I have a cat, and he scratched one of the little wings from it and you realize, you know, like it's cool, you know, it shows that...

...you're like Oh, you know, gives you a bit of careerble, but that's about it. You know, for me, the the drive now is not winning anything else, you know, or anything like that, because you realize it doesn't it's it feels good for a little bit and then that's about it. It doesn't really come with any meaning. You know. For me it's more important to create, for example, like a community or the content that you're creating and engages other people, you know, and then having other people each other, like you guys, you know, like hey want to hop on on the podcast? Yeah, for sure. I would have never met you guys. You know, we're never had this conversation, you know, and maybe out of this. I might be able to do a story with you guys down the line, you know, like hey, you know, like a story about podcasting comes up. Oh, I know some podcasters, man, you know. Like. So, creating this engagement and meeting other people, you know, and growing, because now I get access to your platform as well, you know, and to your listener versus as well, you know, and they bear my store and I keep telling stories and I find that that to be more meanful, you know, creating that content that you like and what you want to put out, other than any for like, Oh, I want to do this store because I want that canny you know, because at the end of the day, I realized that once you get it, you're still felt left feeling a little bit empty, you know, like okay, it's that want an emmy and I call it a career. I want to Alve. I call it a career after that, because I want to Alve you know, you want to keep going, you know, and you stopped caring about those things. Damn, that's like a flex Ross, like like like it does messy feel that way, like really, like, because it's what like that? Yeah, like that's like that's pay like the way, like the way you saying like him, Bro, like that's that's like big things, like twelve emmy's, like that's like, well, a lot of like journalists strive for, but an at the same time, like yeah, they're just an award for all the work, hard work, that you put in. The a's what you're shriving for that game. More followers, to people would go to you to watch your stories and your credible. But I think that's like this is your professional but like that's that's what you love to do. So you don't look at it as just, Oh, I want this or one that. You know, you should enjoy the whole thing, you know what I mean? The whole like your first relay rocks, like your job, obviously. Yeah, you know I mean. So that's probably why he doesn't oh yeah, yeah, for sure. And don't get me wrong. I mean when I first started getting those, you know, it was awesome. I was super proud of them, you know, and I still am. You know, it's awesome, and I was driving in the win the next one, you know, and I wanted to win the best reporter, you know, and all that stuff. But then you realize, you know, it's awesome and then it just sits there and I feel like throughout time it's been a problem. I said this for me, you know, because is it is. I haven't gotten to you know. So, you know, after the faith for the six, you know, they all start kind of looking the same and start realizing, you know, we're in the situation. You know, it's awesome to have them, but it doesn't really come with much after that. You know, it's like what's next? Oh, yeah, I was on along so earlier. We're I don't alwayshould tell them. Well, honestly, like we're saying, like I think it's time for like, for example, on yester in the ports. I feel like it's time for like change, like like, you know, like as like it should be like the new generation, you know, the new you generation of like journalists, and it's going to put this. I feel like that holding up, like, you know, like because there's been like even for like a lot of this happening. I only be see on Telemundo they keep the same like broadcasters to keep the same journalists for like a long, long period of time. A lot of people don't want to see the same point of view. In a way, no, I agree, and I'll tell you this. I feel like, if you're going to be in that platform for thirty, forty years, you better get with the time. You know, you better make it worth my time, because you see these suits, you know, that are in the studio and are just used to the way that they used to do things in one thousand nine hundred and seventy. We're as someone younger like you or or you, you know, you could help on there and making the same content that he's putting out, but more creative, more faster, more entertainment, more engaging. So I feel like it's not in terms of how long they get there, it's if you're going to stay in there, you better get with the time and you better be willing to put the time and make your stories interesting, make your content interesting. You know, or I was, these young bloods are slowly going to start coming in and I'll tell you this, this is something that I've noticed in my industry and used you know, I remember going into every station that I've gone into, you know, there's these like traditional journalists that have been there forever and you know there's always kind of like Oh, that's that's the top reporter there, but then there's nineteen year old kid shows up that knows how to shoot, that knows how to edit. That ashead of right and I can do what you can do as well, because I went to school for it as well and I'm a journalist as well and I'm not about. I can do all these other crazy things. Will Guess what? I end up getting priority in certain stories here and there after that, because this young blood comes in and he's working harder than you are, he's creating better content that you are, because he's actually pushing out, he's working hard and they're already comfortable. They've been there for twenty five years, they've been there for thirty years doing the same thing where I want it, you know. If you don't want it, I want it, you know. And you come in and you work harder and you start seeing that shift. I do agree, for example, like any ESP in the port this and all those, they need to get with the times, man, because sometimes I put it on a fuck support this on like caul reason man,...

...like you here, and it's like, and that's why, and that's what I mean, like that's where you guys come in and you know, you create your platform, and I started listening like, Hey, I want to listen to some food board, but I'm listening to these same guys. I talk the same smack for the past forty years about food. You know, I hop on and the suddenly I find your podcasts and I listen to you guys, you know, to going on to a back on forth on what you're doing, giving me the new perspective, giving me a better audio, you know, giving me a little bit more different story or he's, you know, different content, creative content, original stuff. I'm as listening to you guys, and then slowly, after time, these companies are going to start noticing about you guys. Or even when you apply, you could show what you've been doing and hey, I can do this instead. You know, this is how I would do this. What do you think about this? Or your platform just goes off and you find that you're here and these companies, and you know this. You know they're slowly going like this. They're slowly going like this. Another companies are going like this because they're not getting with the Times. They're not getting with the times and the same as with Internet, you know, like for us and news and TV, TV is an outdated for him. You know TV is outdated. Man. What was the last time you sat down to actually other than sports, you know, to say, you know what, I want to watch some TV. Let me turn on see what's on CBS. Let me see what's on Nev sew. You know, it's more of an old school and for our generation it's that's that's that's our struggle, you know, and in a way to create and stay updated, you know, and I feel like that's where we notice that some places like, for example, bleacher report, which was down here in Espn, you know, or you just being the fourth, was down here, and then slowly you start seeing them, know, go the other way because why you're keeping the same suits. So we here for forty year saying the same stupid shit that they've been saying, and you have these guys, you know, giving me like, Oh, here's your top your top ten soccer players of the last fifty years, and you give me some good background research, you know, you give me some animations, you give me some video, you know, you give me a podcast talking about it, you know, rather than just like no, patsicultless gets is in the port, not to lass, because this in my hood, you know, and you have them arguing and same shit all all the time, and that's that difference. You know, it's getting with the times and it's creating that content. And slowly, man, it might still feel frustrate when you see those, but you're going to start seeing, man, that's slowly going to have to start going away. And if they don't, then the whole platforms going to go away. If they don't get with the Times, people are going to make them outdated because, guess what, you don't need to go to espn the point, because you could just go online and find what you want. So you're not tied by that channel, whereas in before, you know, you only have the option to switch the channel to Oh, TBS and BC when you be shown. Okay, go around again, you know, and that's the only thing that was transmitting, you know, for you in terms of entertainment, in terms of news, in terms of sports, you would only get it from there, whereas in now, if I really want to find sports at one in the morning, I can go and find sports one in the morning. You know, someone comment any on it. So I feel like it's that and I know it's frustrating, man, but it's going to be that transition or as in they don't get with the Times or their platforms going to die. Yeah, because that's what I feel like we'll hop with the newspaper. Like the newspapers to me is like it's like completely dead, like even in in college, even this year, we still like work a lot on the newspaper, and that's that is mostly like a large focus, but it's like it's slowly dying. Everything is going online, digital and especially during the coronavirus to like there's like a fifty percent increase, and that's like huge of amount of people who listen to podcast during this time because they have a lot of more time than they're traveling, I guess, a lot more and just like different networks are exploding because of the circumstances. Yeah, and for you guys that are in the podcast the world, you know, podcasts are only going to keep rowing. You know, you're in a you're in an area where you're starting early. You're like one of the early. I mean, podcasting has been here forever, but it's barely, you know, getting that attention that it deserves, you know, and you're getting that piece of real estate early. You know, it's like you're you're some of those explorers. I came to America and you got your piece of property. And Guess What, in twenty thirty years that's going to be very expensive, you know, and you see that. For example, even meme accounts on instagram. There's this account called the Quan and Yah, I got that. Yeah, you know what means. Well, that account just got bought by four hundred and twenty five million dollars by Warner brothers. Shit, and just by creating that digital presence, you know, they were able to sell off that because it's going to be interesting to warner brothers, because, why, that's where the attention is, you know. and He created that early real estate where there was not a lot of mean pages on instagram. Now there's a million, but he was one of those early pioneers and was able to get that piece of real estate is now worth a lot, twenty five million bucks, where it was for free for him to just create that account and post those names. Say That's that's a lot of us for twenty five million. Yeah, so we're going to sell this podcast? Yeah, for like thirty millions. Hey, why not? Yeah, all the old casts, I'm just going to see you too, I turn on the TV to see you to sitting there talking smack left and right now. Hopefully, hopefully, it's gonna Happen. So so what what like? What video...

...like got you on Tick Tock? That was like okay, all this got views or this one topped off? Yeah, something else. Yeah, that's something I wanted to ask you to like. I feel like every reporter has that story that they're like known for, other they're like most like that stands out to them. Like for me, for example, I wrote a story for the school newspaper and it was on the men's national team, for the US soccer team, and it was it got like a thousand views and like a week, and to me that was like damn. And then like a couple weeks it went to like Twentyzero and to me that's always like stand like damn. Well, like it's like a one to two minute read and twenty people read it like in a couple weeks. So what story for you or tick Tock, like stands out for you personally? What's funny, because I think for me it has to be separate, because for tick tock it wasn't even a new story that that got, you know, big I did this video where I was doing like how, you know, how people movies in Spanish get dubbed and they get like this really cheesy dubbing. Yeah, like, you know, they could be saying like Oh, I really like potatoes and they're like thenkun tell's but beat, that's what he does, you know, and like were exaggerated voice. So I did that, you know, I recorded myself in English and I voiced over, you know, in Spanish, and then that one. I had probably like maybe twenty followers at the time, and then I did that video and it got like seven hundred thousand views and hundreds of thousands of likes and I was like Oh wow, and suddenly, like my father can went up to five thousand, you know, and I was like, okay, we could start creating more of this content. I noticed why I could hate it's until such a young platforms like okay, I can even put someone new stories here, and I start putting some new story sallows performing and then slowly I started, you know, putting a little bit of both. You know, I still do, you know, like some cheesy skits in there. You know, I do my news and I took try to throw in a little bit of everything and mixing it up, but that one for sure. You start off with like a comedy video that I did and then I grew to a platform and then people realize, oh, he's a reporter and they started following me for those reasons as well, you know, not just because I was this guy doing the comedy thing, but I'm also doing like reporting and all that stuff. And in terms of an actual news story that I got big, well, it's been a few because I used to work in the capital in California and you know, I would often be in the national news doing a lot of coverage. But the stories that for me, that stands out that I really liked covering, I'll keep it sports related. I did the last game of the Golden State Warriors in at Oracle and the way that I made that one news was it's the last game, so I went out to the city and the field of the Latinos, you know how they felt about the Golden State Warriors, and ended up finding a bunch of great characters of people that were really big warriors fans, you know. And then for that I got my NBA game six pass and I was able to go and watch and watch the game right there in the in the front and enjoy it, you know, and it was awesome being able to go to a game six where the Raptors lifted the NBA Championship. They won't, you know, and that was awesome to be there, you know, and that was a story that got sent out throughout all the California because, you know, it was it was sports related. And then there's also all these other stories that I did. This one't got a lot of attention, as well as these nuns that grow and make weed products. So here you have a nun, you know, she has her like hair dress and her whole thing and she's moking a blunt, you know, in camera, and I and I have her. I told her, I was like, because she did the whole process, like it can get your camera smoking a joint. Yeah, but tell she put she's she even told. She's like yeah, but till after we do all the interview and and shooting, because it's going to get me dumb, because she's like we grow good stuff here and kids. You not like we got a contact. I just recording her. But my story starts off like this. You know, you've got a nun lighting it up smoking the joint. That's going to get your attention. You're going to want to watch that, you know. So that's definitely a story that I definitely had fun. It's gotten a lot of attention, you know, by but it's because of the nature of a story as well, and it's something I feel like like vox media. They do a lot of stories like around stuff like that and they gain a lot of a lot of traction online, but a lot of people don't really consider them like new source. But they do a lot of videos with like crazy stuff and they given catalgory categorize himself as a as a news entity, and they get a lot of views and they making a lot of money. To box is a it's a huge company now and and I love it because they went into a space that we were lacking in, you know, in terms of because I do consider them a news entity. Of your creating youthful content. You're news and team. You guys have sports broadcasters. Just because you don't have the million dollars set up, it doesn't make you supports brass casters. Your Broadcasting Sports and you're talking about what you like, you know, and that makes you that you know, and I feel like box, you know, found an opportunity where they're like hey, we need a lot doing to get with the times, and it's very visual platform. They do a lot of informent, information, in graphics, in terms like that. And the same way vice. You know, they go and create those stories. The...

...going create those stories. They go and talk to, you know, the those nauticals, those drug dealers, you know, those stories were, you know, the traditional media doesn't go to and they give you that, you know, that explanation and that extra contacts and they found their their platform and that real estate, I guess, and Gus, going back to that term. You know, they found their little piece of real estate and news and now they're huge. And now what? Just this probably like the last question of what do you feel sports media is headed to that you feel like it's all been done, like it's all like around interviews or like this stuff. Now we're stuff like bleach report, though, play like FIFA with like a soccer player. You feel like sports media's heading into that direction? Oh Man, I think it's interesting. I think there's a lot of future. I don't think I'll all of it has been done, specially with all we don't know what the next platforms that are going to be coming out in the future, you know, and how that's gonna play into effect. But for you guys, I mean I feel like there's always an opportunity. Right now you have a big opportunity. That's stick tock. You know, you could claim your piece of real estate there. I personally haven't really found anyone there that gives me highlights that I want to consume in tick tack. Now you have to find the way on how to do that. You know, it can just be like how traditionally it's done on TV, and you got to find your format to do it there and what works, and it take some experimentation. But if you come up with an original contact that works, I bet you that's some piece of area that's going to keep growing, you know, and people are going to try to exploit in that area. You know, it's also in streaming, man, like you said, in Pifa. You know, if you guys could be talking about you know, you could very easily. I have a friend that loves school La will better at moles and when we're playing PIFA, like we're playing all your meal awesome, you know, and then just talking smack. You know all your Al Walabill or law as in positive, you know, and they talk so much Mac and I'm over here crying laughing when I'm playing with them online because they're so funny. I have two friends that they just go back and forth and I'm like, Dude, you guys could do a twitch, you know, stream yourselves, you know, playing. Some people teach, I eating. Talk exactly, man. Everybody's doing it, you know, and you hop on there and you maybe in this not talking smack like these guys, but you two are like all right, man. So today we're going to give you some something about, and this is just me spitting in an idea, you know, a little preview of the Arsenal Manchester United Game. My boy additor is going to be arsenal, whm whoop them, and I'm will be Manchester United. So what do you think? Oh, well, you know what I think. William's gonna, you know, going to have a really great game. And then you start deep diving into it as you're playing the game, you know, and like maybe that's another area you can get some attention and, you know, doing it through twitch. So I feel like there's a lot of opportunities that are going to be coming up in different platforms, but it's about who gets with it immediately, because, remember, if you don't do it, somebody else is going to do it and they're going to come and they're gonna do it, you know, and that's what happened with the Kuan. You know, there's dude got into it earlier, he started posting his names early and now he's sitting on twenty five million dollars, you know, and it's getting with it and finding and I think you guys have a great advantage because you know what you want to do. You know it's it has to be sports for you guys, you know, and if you straight through that, I mean very easily, you guys can get very corporate jobs and you know and forget about it, but then that's where your dreams go to die. Right. You kind of gotta go and push for it and work for it, and I know that is going to be tough and know that no one's going to be watching you for a very long time. But you say, with that consistency you can really grow with it or grow yourself into a position that you can apply to a place that you want to be in that maybe you don't have the qualifications right now, but you could in a few years. Yeah, that's a lot of you gave some gems. Honestly, not be a teacher. I think today you should like sell a course. Is like how this is just bit falling ideas. But you know, it's about getting with it and understanding and understanding how it works. And still myself, I'm not as I'm not as good on social media as I could be, you know, and I need to be better about about that. And I feel like we all, we all need to understand that that's where the direction is, you know, and understanding and applying you know, and sitting down and creating your content and formatting it. It's not just bitballing and standing there and just kind of doing it. It's putting a little bit of thought behind it and how am I going to execute it? Have a little plan. Then that plan gives you a Guyne you know, from here until the end. And you know, for you guys, you know even if, for example, donald trump comes out and throws a bombing in Russia, that's not going to be in your show man, unless they throw it in a soccer stadium, then that's for good, because we seek. You were covering sports. Yeah, you know, and people go to you to cover sports, to watch sports. You know. So you need to you need to find your area and say this is what we're going to cover and this is what we're going to take truth to and this is what we're going to do. And you, if you have a plan and you keep going with it, it's going to work. Yeah, it is. And then, before we end up the podcast, who do you think is gonna who do you think has a better start right now in terms of like possibly winning the Champions League and European soccer? Corso Muscle? Nah Man, that's a tough...

...one, man to sorry, yeah, you would just be Chelsey to are often ask you. So all they yeah, yeah, they beat they beatom to zero. So there. They also won their first two games. Tonham, like we said talking about earlier son. He scored four goals and they have bell coming into and I got that right. Back on city, it's Nottingham and champions this right. They finish top, for I think they finish lest we because because if they did, the Tottenham has a really good chance because they got out in Yo as well. So Kane, well, the our horse for this upcoming juously. Honestly, they're cur's for sure, but I mean, I gotta go. I'm the Madrid Fan, so I gotta say Madrid, but I honestly I think they're gonna have a bit of a hard time. But Munich, man Bayern, Munich, their as just beast, because they did killing it. They won their first league game a zero in your dude, that's I got sell. You know, Dude. That's like they were already good and they are. They got even better with yeah, I think they have. They have a good opportunity. I know Diago just went over to Liverpool. Ever, Liverpool always has a good chance. Parents they have the money. Manchester City, they got the money, you know. So they're always contenders, but they may need to get to that next level. But for sure I think the best opportunity still bird, you know, to do to do a repeat. They got a really good team right now. But we'll see that. We'll see. I'm not mean. I'm still praying for for Red Madrid or a Real Madrid win, but we'll see, because I feel like Manchester City would have reset that next step. They would assigned messy because they've always in yours they've done good domestically, but and you're like European. Wise, I feel like they need that egg trapeze, even though their team is like stack. That's like they needed. They need a messy. Messy would have definitely made on Alie. I mean, I'm not, I'm not a fan of I mean I'm a fan of messy, how he plays. I think he plays beautiful soccer. I'm just not a fan of him because he's in box selona. So I have to hate on him. But once you put messy on any team, I feel like, especially on team at stacked as Manchester City, their favorites to win, and that's something that might happen next season. You know, the only reason messy didn't leave is because the president of Barcelona didn't allow the transfer. Didn't get set them off, you know. So I meant that they have to play this crazy F for him. So Messy said, I'm not going to think against the court. Love Barcelona, so I'm just stick it out and I'm going to leave next season. So I think that's something is going to happen unless they miraculously, and I say that miraculously, when the champions, then maybe he will stay, but I doubt it. Man West on this season did he like three good, like solid players, but which I feel like they're not. The window closes in like a month, so I don't think they're going to really sign anybody else other than probably a genial desk American. We have another American, probably either going to bear Munich or Orcelona. Well, that's the thing about Barcelona, you know, you remember they brought all the players up from Lamacia. You know, when they had, you know, that old school style of what they call it total, total football, you know, which comes from way back in the day, from groove through, you know, and and then three formations. Yeah, we with Johan, you know, it's a total football. They learned in art and within he learned in a jugs, brought it set up Lama seea brought European success for them. But what are they allowed? was under him. But what are they allowed was coaching these young kids. Brought him up with that mentality and I feel like a lot of people are starting to realize that farming your players is the way to go. And Barcelona in recent years, ever since they switch that presidency in two thousand and fourteen, we've been trying to buy these star players. Man, they've been dropping a lot of dough on players that are not from them that it or not, don't not fit in their identity, because it's very hard to play in that system. And look at the players that don't fit, you know, like even if I he move, each didn't fit in that system because sometimes what it means for them is if you move here, then that means the other player has to come around the area, even though that you have an open opportunity to go through your chat. Your job is to send the pass over, you know, and a lot of players forget that and they go for shot and guess what that means? You get bench. You know, you don't fit in that Batlona system, because Barcelona doesn't play to win trophace, but I don't know, place to win beautiful and they believe that their mentality and their mantra they played a win championship. They don't play to win championship, they play to play beautiful and that brings championships down the line and I feel like they straight a little bit from that identity in recent years and until they get back into that pace, that's when it's bout. Slona is going to start doing well again. Yeah, because even like they're most it was announced like yesterday, ricord of week, like the next met on, I don't want to say the next messive, like the next yester coming up, it was announced that common the new coach, he wants to send them off all to plind a new team. Yeah, he told him Shit Up, like I don't have you contemplated for the season. Go, go somewhere we're actually going to play. And that's crazy to think, because I feel like, after Ansufati, that's probably like the best youngster Barcelona has on their squad, exactly. But they're not, they're not getting in that time. They just brought this player, how, what's his name? From Juventus? That's good, Yanni. Yeah, P Jiant for Johanney. Yeah, yeah, they just brought him from Juve, and that took that opportunity from from a youngster. He's know, so it's like exactly projection. They shipped over and even younger kid,...

...you know, if they Arthur, Arthur. So they need to get back, they need to get back to that identity and I think that's what's going to help them. But for now I'm going to cash it on Bayern. Munich winning Champions League this year. Yeah, I don't want it, I don't want it, I don't want it, I don't want it. But I think that's from what we've seen, at least last season. We got to see how this season goes on and everybody else performs. But yeah, guys, the same thing. Game Muni little. That's a good team at team I don't like. You'll never walk alone. Man. Are you for the Premier League? Do you like? Well, I would definitely say I'm a united fan. Oh, yes, yes, we had a tough one with Crystal Palace, but yeah, but we won't discuss that in this podcast. We won't discuss that. What it like? What invender? Because start that's something that good brother like. You just signed a player, a young so you're not going to start him off from your first game. Well one, we came in as a subbany school. Or we start off with the left, with the leftons that with the right. But we're we're getting better. You know, we had a hard time since Alex Ferguson left and we haven't really gotten any shit together. I feel like that Chevrolet sponsor is a curse on that team on like ever since I started wearing that. Yeah, it was logo every sime. We started wearing that ugly as logo on the stomach. We haven't watched it, so I should stay with so, yeah, Nike Chat even like Yeah, man, those were the uniforms back when from Aldo was on there. I remember. That's like one of those status yeah, you think we're all got back. Most of him like leaving after this season, but you men to that they don't want anything. Maybe maybe I could. I would love to see him back, but I think for another might want to come to the US because he's a family he's a family man. Now, I mean, you know, you just saw equayin coming down to to Miami. Yeah, with the great productful. Oh Yeah, yeah, lest I think it has a lot of room to grow, I think, especially arts quacks. They just got whooped what zero or something like that yesterday by the one against Portland, so it definitely has a long way to go. I feel like they have to do a lot of work, you know, even just rallying up the base. You know, they like the earth things will do, at least from what I've seen, you know, like community work or be involved in the community, and I feel like that's where it starts off, you know, because you need to get those for one interest in the team to youngsters that start playing for that, for that and setting up academies for youngsters from poor communities are rich communities to play, because here you can, you can get up someday pick up team. But what happens in those some day pick up leagues? You know, half of the team is cruel. You know, they come in maybe drinking and yeah, half time, because we play, we see this all the time. We can play Sunday for a couple and we see, yeah, they'll be like drinking a half time and I'm like Bra which on a win. Yeah, exactly. And then for kids like you guys, you're stuck with that. And guess what, you're stuck there and you don't move up to the next level because that's, you know, the environment that you're in and that's your competition that you're in. But if you want to play club, guess what, get ready to shell out thirty five hundred bucks for your kid every season, a whole paid at all as fucked. Yeah, and our families can't do that. Are Fats. A lot of our families can't paid. You know, that per season. So that's why you only see those green meet those that are killing it in high school, because they've been, you know, playing and getting the the development that they need and they might not be as talented as you, but they've been through this process, they've been trained, and I feel like that's where the MLS needs to do that culture shift and create camps and academies and Youth Academies that are based on talent and on merit rather than how much you pay into going into that club, you know, and having scouts and identifying young talent from a young age, because soccer is a very young sport that you can start showing if you're good or not by fourteen, five hundred and sixteen. Even identifying these youngsters are are working hard, taking them out, maybe out of these Sunday leagues where they're smoke, they get they're prone to at one point even start getting joining up, fucked up, you know, or smoking, you know, and getting deviated, and giving them more concentration, you know, setting them down the right path, educating them and then developing that, and that creates more attractive soccer. At the same time, since you're doing that community engagement, people are going to start coming more to the stadiums. You know you're getting the community involved. They're gonna be there, they're going to be supporting you, especially if you're winning games. So it has to be a whole culture ship and I think it can be done. I'll give you an example in just to close off, in New Mexico there's a USL team, there's the UN New Mexico united, and they just started last season and now they have the highest attendants in the USL. But they're very community based. They're they've gotten involved with all the artists locally. They're creating an entire different culture. And guess what? Their stadiums are packed and the team is performing well. Why? Be? Because they started with the community. Instead of like here's a sports team, come watches, it's like, no, here's a sports...

...team for you guys, and this is why we want to earn your trust. They have a local sponsor, they they partner with with local artists. Are there's this collective called me Owol and they've made a very arts and culture and that's New Mexico Arts and culture. So you get that involved with soccer. My brother never liked soccer. My older brother, who lives in New Mexico. He never liked soccer. This dude is a season ticket holder for New Mexico united and he didn't use to be like that's anger, because they're and they're able to capture. And guess what? My brother now talks to me about soccer. He asked me questions. You know, he has his own Jersey. You know, I spent them that. He's into economics. I sent them a book I read on Soccer Economics that I was like, Hey, you really like how the process of economics and soccer works? You know, here's a book, you know, and now he's reading and he's interested in it. So you're trying. You that's a you get. You know those. You know those people that that are like soccer. Now you need to come to one of the Games. It gets down. But it needs to be a community, in to be an environment, and I think that's what the MLS needs to do, and once they start doing that, they're gonna they're going to go up, because if there's something that the US has his money man and and I think it's only going to go up, it's going to keep growing and a near you guys, you know you have the Sacramento Republic that's going to be coming out. They're getting a new stadium at there the downtown area, and Sacramento Republic Games get crazy and that's going to be a good thing for that city and hopefully, you know, it keeps building in these other in the USL's they start building the second division league, they start building these communities like what's happening in New Mexico and gives that attraction to for people to want to watch the MLS. Let me to need to make an attractive for getting really good like I feel like a lot of journalists to like make some try to get like a beat reporter out there for that USL team or get a beat reporter for the MLS, for the local newspaper exactly, or for you guys, look, you have an opportunity with two teams in your area. You know, maybe that's a I don't know if there's many reporters doing covering mls, you know, but you could be the B reporter for the earthquakes and then that's a good opportunity for Youtube boys to go and watch the games every weekend and then go to the Sacramento Republic Games cover them to you know, and maybe you don't need that credential passage. Yeah, they're not mine. Not Give you that, but you could buy those cheap seats at the stands. You know, we leave and record, you know, the environment there and included in your podcast, you know, like hey, and so we went to it. What's up, guys? So we're right here at the Sacramento Republic Game. You know, the people get back here, you know, creating that beat for you guys, for the MLS, and start making it attractive, and Journal is putting and pushing that content down and showing others how exciting it is and pushing it out, and I think that's what they need to do. They need to mark it a little bit better and they need to focus on the users. Yeah, because something I was communicating with one of the people who work with the hounds at earthquakes and I was asking her, like what do they do, like for heritage nights and stuff like that, and she was saying like Oh, like, they have like a Latino night and all they giveaways like a blank and I'm like, well, you want to reach like your like your main audience. I feel like his Mexicans, especially with my ties Alameida, even though he's Argentina, but he's coming from us. Was While de la Nice, who's Mexican, Carlos Fierro, who's Mexican. You want to reach the audience and you're giving away like blankets for Latino night, like they need to do a lot more to reach that. Yeah, they need to get in the community, man, but once they do, I feel like bill. They need to do it, I need to do them. then. Well, thank you for reaching a problem, guys. So especially thanks. Sorry. Yeah, yesterday me go Gomez. All his social media will be in the description. And Yeah, what about rafted up? Guys? So like the video? So yeah, sure, it's your mom dad, and yeah, that's it. Thank you. As we go. Hey, thank you. It was awesome talking to you, guys.

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