Sounder SIGN UP FOR FREE
Goat Talk
Goat Talk

Episode 8 · 1 year ago

Goat Talk Podcast 008 | Solano College Soccer Coaching Staff Interview, Coach and Sport Psychologist

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In episode 008 of Goat Talk, Alonso Frias and Edgar Padilla interview the coaching staff of the women's soccer team from Solano Community College in Fairfield. Jeff Cardinal, and Kevin Marks offer an inside perspective on how the corona virus has affected the team, how players deal with stress, how mental skills training and psychology help the team succeed, the mental process of a youth soccer player throughout his life, how SCC acquired a World Cup golden boot winner as an assistant coach, how the Seattle Seahawks helped prepare Marks for his role, and what Solano needs to do in order to grow as a soccer community, among other topics.

Business Inquiry: aftv707@gmail.com

Welcome everybody. This is a episode eight of goat talk and we have two new special guests today. Yeah, we have the Slana Community College Women's soccer head coach, Jeff Cardinal, as well as the high performance and mental skills coach Kevin Marks, which also does strength and conditioning for the team. So the morning how we do her good are you? Could you tell us like a little by yourself? Yeah, so I'm a Salama College women soccer head coach. I'm actually this is year nineteen for me. It's Alma, so I've been there a long time. Most of my career has been coaching soccer at the junior college level. I did that in a couple of community colleges before then and then I've been doing it ever since. It's Salano for twenty years. And then, of course we teach could seology, we teach other classes as well as long as part of our full time position set in with me, you got it on the high performance coach. And so with that untils is mental skills, which is really kind of wrapped around sports psychology, and then strength conditioning as well. And in addition to that I teach in the Psychology Department here at Salama so fired up, ton of fun. I was gonnage. Let me ask cardinal about from when you first started. He said this is a year nineteen, right. How how's it like evolved from then till now? Yeah, I mean it's a it's pretty similar from what I started as far as the level wise and them. Yeah, it stays pretty consistent acrop, you know, from the from the beginning years until the later years. As far as the level and, you know, transferring players onto the four year level, that's kind of been pretty consistent. I would say the four year levels gotten a little higher because when we first started off there were some programs that were maybe more of a division three or an Ania level, and now they're division two and so they're transferring players onto some of those little tougher because you got them a higher level athlete in the high higher level player. But in terms of junior college, has been pretty consistent. Our teams have been pretty consistent over the years we had. We did have some years, maybe like in year five and year nine and ten, where we were at a much higher level than we normally are, but for the most part those are kind of our banner our banner years where we went the farthest, but and then all the other years that we've been there we've been pretty much at the same level of concluding right now. Okay, Nice. And how has like Corona affected the team in terms of like scouting, in preparation, like the figuring out a schedule because of this whole Cuz you can have like one on one meetings or one on one training right now. Also, it's all it's all online, and so that's definitely a big impact on the athletes in terms of, you know, they they want to be there in person. That's part of part of the reason they're involved in athletics, is the whole social part of it, or that they want to you know, part being with a team and meeting new teammates and players and whatnot, and so and of course getting coached by the and and getting trained, you know, on the field. And so since the COVID is started, that's really changing because everything's been online. That's been I think it's a pretty big impact on the on the student athletes and the coaches. To is there's no touch out of like like having like a like a shorter season or something. Yeah, what they did. There is a there is a the season got moved to the spring. Okay. So with everything going on, they decided that they were going to do any fall sports or athletics the college level, and actually they they, if you you probably already know this by watching just the news and everything is everywhere. Is kind of did that initial switch to everything to the spring. So that's what we're doing right now. We're waiting to see how it's going to look in the spring. We hopefully we'll have a season in the spring and it will go it'll be a little shorter and obviously look a little bit different because we're always playing in the fall. Yeah, and so we right now we're just training keep it in shape and to get ready and look forward to the spring season, which is scheduled to start like in February and in March, beginning of April. Okay. So, yeah, it's kind of similar to like the high school and we're going to start in December. Wis are practicing and stuff like that, and then the season starts where it was supposed to end. Basically it's going to start like at the end of February. Yeah, so everything's moved to the spring. So that's kind of what at least at the junior college in high school levels, they are pushing all the sports to the spring instead of trying to do something in the fall. Okay. And then, in terms of that, like how do you find your team chemistry, because I feel like, especially like club, not club like high school teams and college teams, I view them like as a national team, because they're getting players from like different areas,...

...from different clubs. But how do you find that chemistry, especially since they've been coached by like different coaches and they've played on they play like on different teams and now they all come together to play on one team for Salana right well, under normal times, the summer training for us is key. That's a big thing because, yeah, we got players from all different high schools and all different cities in Slano and even some other areas that are coming together. So what's what I we do it Salana. We do it eight week summer training session. I think that that's big because during those eight weeks you're trying to build that chemistry, like you said, and kind of get some of these players who have never played together before, on the same page and working together before that fall season starts. I will say, though, that there's been many occasions at Salanta over the years, including the last couple of years, where, although we have players from many different areas, this last two years before this year, we had about six or seven players who did play club together. Comes that right, a lot were actually on our team. So that really helped because they've already they know each other personally already, but then they've also played with each other for years and years and years on club teams, and so we've had that happened quite a few times. We'll try to get, you know, there's a few of those club together and then what's what happens? You get a couple of them and usually a couple more will follow and yeah, helps out the recruited. So and then this question kind of for both you guys, but how do you help players deal with like stress, time management and workload, especially they're all student athletes? Yeah, thoughtful question, because that is at the center of what a lot of the athletes go through, you know, especially at our level, where they're not only athletes, their student athletes, and some of which half full time jobs or part time jobs, relationships and many, many things going on, and so and then of course we add the covid nineteen to the mix and that kind of adds a little bit of that the fuel of the fire. And so every persons a little bit different. That you mentioned the chemistry of the team and how that kind of, you know, plays out, and so I like that too, because what happens is is that each individual so unique and there is no one size fits all, and so when you put it individual in a team component or that context, which we call the situation, there's even more variables at play, and so we spend a lot of time working on just that, on the power of the culture. And again, so every every auth is different. When it comes to stress. How stress shows up? You know, some questions to think about, and that's usually where we start with our athletes, as we we ask them a lot of questions, you know, and that ties into chemistry as well. We want to get to know each other so we can lock arms and go do difficult shit together, you know, the way that we hold ourselves accountable, and so, you know, basic questions, you know, even for you guys, is is how does how does stress show up for you? You know, some people it's it's more cognitive, you know, they think about things a lot they were worrying about things or apprehensive about that, certainty the times we're in right now. And then maybe some other people it's more of a we call so madic representation, and so it shows up physically. They have headaches, they have migrains in so there's a lot of different ways we look at it. Some people it's a little mixture of gold and so the first thing that we do is we try to drill down on that, and so that's where I come in and work with the athletes one on one to try to really figure out how does it show up, how does it show up for them? And really like what you said, especially about time management. I think we hear that term a lot, and in college I really they think that that's at the center of a lot of issues that we see among young athletes at the freshman sophomore level, particularly at the community college level, is being able to not just manage time but manage our own mental representation of how we're viewing time and how we're viewing stress load and workload, to use your word. And then academic rigor. There's so many things going on and so we get clear on what that is. Again, there is no one size consolved, but there are specific patterns that emerge, one of which is a lack of self awareness. So I'm I fall on the side of, you know, the sun coming up. So I'm really optimistic, and so I look at this opportunity, or I look at this covid nineteen situation as an opportunity. And here's what I mean is we've spent a lot of time in the offseason right now working on what we call psychological framework, and really what that is is self awareness. So how do we deal and manage all the stress in the chaos of time management and, you know, all this stuff that we're talking about, load, workload that you're talking about? Well, there's there's a lot of things, but one of which...

...is what we call self awareness, and there's a perception that we have high self awareness. I think with our young athletes, and and I think the work that we do has shown otherwise, is that there's actually a lack of self awareness, and so we spend some time working on that. And meaning like what is like? What are they all about as well as a person? Who are they like? Who are I mean ask that question. This is a philosophical question, but like, who are we who are we becoming? How do we view situations? Is a threat, is an opportunity or is it a challenge? And then lately we've been working on the three WS. So how we pull us together with stress managing all this stuff is you know, what is high performance look like? I mean, think about this, fellows. For you guys, like right now, with what you're doing, you know, ask your self these questions. You know, what is high performance look like for you? What is it feel like when it feels good to be you right? What does it sound like in your head when you're on it, like when you're really being you at your best? That's the what. Then we asked the why. Why is it that you're doing what you're doing? Why is it important to you? That's really important, because when you're getting punched in the mouth because of a covid nineteen situation or fires and the smoke everywhere in the world's flipped upside down, we start to question ourselves why? Why? Y? Y? So we want to address that question like right now. And then the last part is where. You know, where are we going? And that's kind of a long term stretch goal, and all those keep us connected to this framework, you know, that self awareness that allows us to stay in the game, and then we also use a lot of that with that team chemistry as well. And so there's a very long way to explain a very complex, you know, situation that we're definitely in right now, and I feel like a lot of players they need to realize how college is like that, basically that final stuff before like puzzily turning pro for like I feel like mentally, they should go into that, into that atmosphere, and be like, Oh, Yo, out to have to perform at a very high peak and be consistent throughout the whole season, and that's when I feel like the mental thing comes in. Oh Dude, you got it right there. What you said is consistency. Is What we've seen from the data, research and just really also, you know, you just see it is consistency. There's reasons why performers are consistent and they work from what we call a sturdy framework. You know, they don't wait until they're getting punched in the mouth to figure out how they're going to think about things when they're getting punched in the mouth. Of that makes sense. Yeah, so it's almost like learning how to swim while we're drowning. We don't want to do that. I don't want to wait till I get into a division one level practice to see how things are going to go based on how I'm going to feel where we called out. We don't want to do that. We want to get ahead of that. It's called frontloading. So we're going to slowly train our mind before we test it publicly, you know, and so that leads to that consistency. Now it takes work, man, there's no it is not easy. It takes those are hard questions to ask and answer, as well those introspective questions, and then, you know, being able to train every day, day in the day outstaying connected to who we are. It's not easy. It's not easy to show the world who you really are, you know, on the field or just in Gen girl. Yeah, you see, you're asking as far as the stress and the student athlete and of course, kind of being the head coach, kind of looking overseeing that whole that whole thing. The student athlete today, and you kind of mentioned this, it's it's a different student athlete than we had, let's say five, maybe ten years ago. The difference for me is there's more going on. Yeah, there, you know, they have the work, they have the family, to have the school, they have their social time there had their cell phone time. Right. We spend a lot of time wanting all of these things that before maybe we didn't have, we didn't do and less and they tend to take more on it seems like they all want to work, whereas that there's been some times in the past where I'd have student athletes who were really focused and they were looking at their academics was a high priority for them. In athletics was a high priority and they would not they wouldn't work, or if they worked, it was very little. Now you're finding student athletes is very common for them to work twenty thirty hours a week more, plus their full time students, plus they're playing a sport and we're traveling and we got all this kind of stuff going in and then their families wants them to do all these kind of social events at the same time and crazy. So you're doing a lot of things today versus the versus before. So that makes it a little more challenging. But so that's changed over the years. Like I said, in the athletes a little bit different, but in terms of handling some individual situations. And you mentioned time management as well. We actually Kevin actually leads like a time management workshop, if you will, or at least lecture, and we go over some...

...some things on on what they're the time management should look. Most of them, I would say, have some time management skills, but I think everybody there's something still to learn. Yeah, time management and the way we approach it, as we approach it from a student athlete perspective, to where, okay, look, first of all, you got US committed to a soccer team, so you got to mark out that time in terms of what you're going to be doing throughout the day. So and then you put your classes in, all that kind of stuff. So we kind of show them, hey, how do you build your week schedule? When do you, you know, throw in some study time? You know, be consistent, have some routines and that kind of stuff. So we go over that with them. I think that helps them in terms of that. And then on the other thing, as far as these student athletes dealing with all this kind of stuff, because you mentioned stress and their stress and there could be other psychological things that they're dealing with as well. That is that's why I brought in coach marks and I saw a need for that and I said, hey, you know what, as time goes on, and by the way, this is the hottest thing going like in sports and athletics right now, is mental skills. Is like the hottest thing that that's that is the number one yeah, so what he can do is individually, where as maybe, as the head coach, I can't really do because I'm dealing with the whole team. He does the one on one trainings with the athletes that he can pull them in and maybe he can help them in certain areas and maybe and I can help them too, and the other coaches can help them too. But he's doing it in different structured way, whereas we're just kind of do it on the fly, like when we ever see something comes up, we kind of address the athlete and stuff, and so I think that's really valuable in our in the program and with everything going on and with some some issues going on, and then we've even mentioned the covid now, which is another psychological thing that they have to do with because it changes their whole lifestyle and their whole that's very important to have that in the program so that's kind of why I had the idea of doing the mental skills is because they could handle that individual thing and in addition, it's not just an individual one on one thing, which I think a lot of things can be helped and you know, you know those types of trainings one on one with the athletes can that can kind of maybe help them through certain areas. Working one on one really make a difference for them. But in addition to that we also do the mental skills training as a team to which is another I think is very important session you mentioned before, like building the chemistry and that kind of stuff, and that all ties into what we're trying to do on the field. We have team training sessions and mental skills that in addition to the one one. So with all that kind of stuff, I think that those that's really important to to have in the program to help out with those things. So I wanted to ask Kevin about a like do you go through anything personally, and I've like you do. How do you go about it? Yeah, absolutely, I mean don't we all? Right, they row. Yeah, and we're all no one's immune to, you know, the situations that we're in, and so I think for me personally, it has taken me a while to adjust, and we all have when we go through we call an adjustment phase, and so we have. I mean, Jeez, we were in March, mid March. Our whole world got flipped upside down. Yeah, and so I Cheez, I can tell you, I don't know, since March, it's probably been maybe two weeks ago, three weeks ago, where I just now finally have figure out a bit of a beat to get back on a routine, to get back into what I do. To think clearly, a lot of it was really tough for me because I really enjoyed the vibe, in the energy of not just the athletes, but because they're amazing, but also I love to be in the class, in it, in a psycholone class that has sixty, seventy students. The energy, the Vibe, I just love that, and that was all of a sudden gone and there was a bit of an adjustment for me with that. And then secondly was the fact that I have, just like students, all the stuff going on and then our time frame is now open ended. There's no slots, there's no okay, I have to be here at that time. I need to be there at that time. So my time demand was the same, but it was more of an open ended schedule component. So specifically, one of my struggles was, and still is, I'm still working with this, is trying to figure out ways to declare that the thing's done, that I'm done working, because I love what I do. I'm so passionate and I cannot believe I get paid to do what I do. And so working with athletes, being an education at the level that we're at and being taken care of and so many different ways, having the resources, all this stuff is so much fun. I think this thing, one of the for me that the struggle was was really trying to figure out ways to, you know, pull back and say that I'm done, because when I was at the college, I would come home I was done. You know, I didn't bring things with me. Now it's everything's merging for me, so everything to hear, so...

...it's all like together. So that was my struggle, was to be able to pull that apart and try to figure out ways to, you know, be more present here at home when when there's a lot of that murkiness. I guess there's so much interface between what I do and then what I do at home, where was it usually that? It wasn't to that level in the past. So that I think that was one of the areas that I continue to try to work on. Yeah, because I feel like too. I feel like soccer, in my perspective, it become a lot more mental, like you don't really see aggression like in the field, like a lot of like shoving pushing. I mean you see that often, especially in the college level, but I feel like it's a lot more tactical, like players think about what they're going to do be or they receive the ball, and I feel like a lot of yellow cars are because of tactical files, especially like in professional sports, like they won't just to slide tackle somebody or to like you only say that I in Sunday lead, for example, but in college I feel like it's become a lot more mental, especially with like anxiety and all this stuff, like they think a lot about what they're going to do with the ball and how they're going to like progress on the field. I don't know what you guys perspective is on that. Yeah, yeah, well, from it's a like that. To get another thoughtful way of looking at it, and one thing when we look at contemporary cognitive psychology in the way that we operate, in store and organize our thought patterns, is one of which is we can't stop thoughts, we can't get out of our head. And so I think some athletes they might have a statement such as this. All I'm in my head too much, I'm thinking too much. Guess what, that's what you should be doing. And so that's the baby is. So the thing is is it depends on how you're organizing things. We might need to turn the volume down, we might need a turn of turn the volume up on certain thought patterns. We might need to reshuffle things at certain thing at certain times, such as when you're in transition and soccer and there's a quick transition, there's certain things you're thinking about compared to when there's a penalty kick. Okay, when there's a break in action. That's a different thought pattern than then, like I just said, transition, or when you're pushing up, you know, push it up with all the you know, with the leg of the field, and so we need to be more getting. I think it goes back to that self awareness, because athletes that are so their self focused they're attaching to thought patterns that don't help them. And so athletes that are selfaware, they can look and see these sauce for what they are. They can pivot and adjust and have the right thought patterns. Now, again, there's a lot of work we do with that, but I guess to make it simple is that, yeah, we need to be thinking when we're especially soccer. It's so rapid fire, things change so quickly. We need to be thinking on the field and there's there's no such thing as like not, you know, no mind or no thoughts. Those are just semantics, maybe in different ways, of same flow state or zone, being in the zone where we have a perception of no consciousness, but flow state and zone states are are really replete with what we call awareness. We're aware of what's going on, and so that is a really good point that you brought up. Oh, I was going to also ask so for like any advice on building like a stronger mentality, your mental and supports, because I feel like a lot of players like bring themselves down, like I feel like they don't have them in tality of like if you miss like a shot right, yeah, am I going to miss the next one? Yeah, I'M gonna go ahead. Yeah, that's that. I think of that, you know. I yeah, and I heaven welcome a lot of them to be in human right. So the first quest question is there's a lot of questions to address, but one of them is like, you know, do you want to be good at what you're doing? You want to really get better? Do you think you can get better? That goes back to growth mindset, right, if you think you can get better, than there's some growth there. We can get better. And then the next question would be how is your relationship with mistakes? Right, most of modern day fear is different than back in the Serengetti we used to be afraid of the Saber Tooth Tiger chasing us just just survive. Now Modern Day fear is we're so dang afraid of looking bad and critique on the other side of making mistakes. So your question that I would ask myself the question what's my relationship with failure? What's my relationship with mistakes? And then we need to start there, you know. And then I would also ask you guys. Do you guys have pets at all? Nah, yeah, well, y'all, y'all know what like a dog is yeah, exactly. Yeah. So let's talk about this. Here's kind of a little bit into the into the mind game, in the fact that it's not simple. It takes work, it takes training, just like training your legs and your body and or metabolic system, the whole thing. So you take a dog to the park. Let's say you take a dog. Did you guys ever have a dog growing up? Yeah,...

Oh, yeah, there we go. Okay, so you take your dog to the park for the very first time and the dogs on a leash to take the dog out to the park and you take the dog off the leash in a real wide open park, what is the dog going to do? It's going to leave and run around. Crazy Dude dogs going everywhere. He's going to look at you live the field, Bam, he's gone. And then what are you going to do as an owner? What you're going to do is you're going to say, Hey, get back here, he'll stay boo to all the stuff. You're going to be telling that dog what to do, yelling at that dog. Is that dog going to listen to you? No, no, not at all. Now let's do this. Let's say that you take about I don't know, two or three weeks, you take the same dog, same leash, same park. Take that dog to the park and you train that dog. You take that leash off and you systematically train that dog what it means to stay, what it means to heal and you work with the dog a little bit. Then you come back, like I said, in two weeks, you take the leaks off. The dogs going to look at you, the dogs going to look at the park, to open field. What is the dog going to do? is going to stay right, because it's times going to stay because he's going to listen to you. Now that's very that's similar to the mind game in competitive sports. And what I mean is this. Many athletes, you know, they come up and say, coach, you know, I'm trying to do this, I can't. I can't calm down after a mistake. Too much anxiety and everything's building up and I tell myself what you said to tell myself and I just can't do it. But the problem is we're not going to listen to ourselves if we don't train ourselves. And basically, so we're not. We're not. It's not like a black of mental toughness. It doesn't mean we're mentally weak. It doesn't mean that it doesn't work. What it means is we got to do the freaking work. We have to train ourselves. We have to put ourselves in those situations systematically and get ready for getting punched in the mouth making mistakes. And we can totally do it. We you totally can do you could dissolve pressure, you can actually extinguish it, like you could totally get it. Now I want to recommend that, because that could also lead to some of the problems. But we could totally train the mind space when it comes to that. So again, another long way of saying we have to we have to do the work. In the first part with your question with mistakes is, well, what's your relationship with mistakes? Do we want to get good or do we want to look good? And so we also have some other steps. Now, I don't know how far you want to go, but there's there's some other steps we take. But fundamentally that's how it works. If you're in the thick of it, you get up and give a speech and you're getting nervous and you're telling yourself, dude, come on and just calm down, you got this not going to work in fact, some people makes it worse if you haven't done the training, two three minutes a day, putting yourself in that position before you get in it, getting down, doing pushups, getting your heart rate up and then working on your self talk and then get giving yourself the opportunity to give your speech when you're dog tired, because that's what's going to happen. You know. That's going to mimic that environment. So that's kind of what we look at. Right there's the thing about some of those questions. You know, how are you viewing mistakes? What's your relationship with failure? Also, what he was saying, like, how do you deal with the mistakes? I think for another thing in this find of as far as accepting that mistakes are going to happen. It happens to all of us, and so and understanding that. So the mistakes are going to be made, failure is going to happen. Yeah, and failure. All the good ones have failed. Everybody. Yeah, they've gone through that. And so you want to instead of having a negative, I guess, negative mindset or, you know, dwelling on it, just understand that that's part of it. And if you're not making mistakes. That probably means you're not really pushing yourself too much to the highest level and you're so those are going to happen, those mistakes are going to are going to happen and, like I said, all the good ones go through it and experience it. And if you know that ahead of time, then and the other thing too, is when you make a mistake, let's say it's during a game, it's you have to move on and you have to just deal with that after the fact, you know, after the so you have a mistake during the game, forget about it, move on to the next one and then keep pushing forward, versus just thinking about it the whole time. And so you got to save that for the end. So we in our in are in this in the soccer environment or when Kevin's working with the athletes. We call that judging. Yeah, and we put a big emphasis on like a don't judge during the game. Don't make any judgment. You got to perform and you got to just keep consistent and go for it the whole game. And when do you actually come back to that moment of failure or mistake is after the fact, when, when the whole thing is done and over. Then you can go and judge it and then how do you respond to that failure? is another, big,...

...big part of it. But I think too many of us in the in the run of player and the in the game, we spend so much time dwelling on, Oh, we made a mistake. I'll even say this, just this from my own experience, but also from athletes experiences. Sometimes in a game when you start off really poorly, yeah, sometimes ends up being your best performance in the game because you just really refocus mentally and at the end of that game you like man, I started off I was sucking it up, you know, I was bad past, bad truth, you know, bad shot. But then all of a sudden that made me refocus early on and really get my mindset, like I said, focused and it ends up being one of your best performances of all time versus like the other way around. So few things on on that the mistakes. This is like a question, I guess, for cardinal to do you feel do you deal with players that have the outside pressure to like we see a lot and like, I feel, like the Hispanic culture, with pressure from parents to say like especially like in the younger playing club soccer growing up, like your parents always press you to my bow, you made this mistake. Like what are you doing and like do you see that like a college level to do you see players carry on that like stigma in their head? That's a that's a good question. I think when you get to the college level, I don't think we have as much insight into that as as much because we're not as close to the parents. Yeah, as as when they're in the youth environment, because I can we go to the youth games. All right, all the parents are right there on the sideline and your they're yelling stuff at the kids and but in our environment, the college level, I don't really hear a lot of that stuff the parents on the other side and whatnot. I mean I may just from talking with the with the athlete, kind of know their background and the pressure that they're their parents put on them and stuff like that. But yeah, I would say it's just just it's don't know as much about that at the college of level. Yeah, it's more disconnected, you know, kind of and then, like I mean, we're on one side of the field, for example, in our college games, parents and everybody else is all totally on the other side. So there's a lot of things we don't really hear or know what's going on. And then, because that's because the student athletes eighteen or over, we're dealing with them kind of directly. We're not really dealing with them and the parents aren't contacting you asking you questions or or they're not contacting you wondering, Hey, how come my daughter's not playing? Yeah, I'll come, she's not a starter, or I'll can she not a so fortunately for us in our positions, we don't really deal with that stuff. We tell the athlete and then they can have the dialog with their parents. Yeah, because if I don't know, though, it's not like that. Yeah, that that now from my perspective, we I have a much different perspective working with a lot of these athletes one on one, and without getting into the details, because I'm not privileged to, you know, disclose all the details of these athletes, but you are correct that they, their parents, have a big they they do play a big part in terms of the pressure component, without a doubt. And there is a cultural there is a cultural component. You know, right on. You know, it looks like you guys have done your work to just really work on that awareness be able to notice some of these things. And so I think again, this is why it's so important that we work on that self awareness with these athletes, because it's it's really healthy to get clear on who we are as individuals, independent of family members, independent of friends or independent of societal norms. We want to have a clear understanding of what we're all about as individuals, and so we actually have we have some specific training tools that we use for that, one of which is called a square squad where, you know, we get really clear with a couple of the people that we want to get feedback from. Okay, now, mom and dad are awesome, man, let me tell you. You know, there are. They're great. And with that, though, they're designed, and why? Are To keep you safe. Yeah, and so they want to make their stand things differently. They're so close to you that their perspective is actually a little blurry. Okay, so there's nothing wrong with them, it's just that their perspective is different than maybe thinking about maybe a friend of yours that really support you but also can challenge you, and so you can go get feedback from that person. And so what we do is we take, we take a beat and we get out a piece of paper and we ride out maybe two. If you're lucky you have three, most people have one. It's either one, two or three people that really get you. So they get you. That means they understand what makes you check. They had they support you and they'll Chang check your ass right, they'll keep you, they will hold you accountable to you being you, and so we get clearer on those people and then when we're competing, we train this right. It's all consistent.

Training is to we don't listen to the rest. It doesn't mean that the rest of the individuals are not meaningful to us. It means we care about them, we respect them, we love them, but we don't give a shit about what they think about us. Right now. That's what a lot of people as they're there and are they're not our square squad. I am not going to focus on that. I can't control that. And so we get really, really clear on that. But you hit it right there. That's a big part. That's a big piece of the parent and getting in the way. And again, respectfully, I'm a parent myself. So the parents, do you know? They're being parents and they're great and we need them, obviously, but the perspective changes a little bit, specially in rugged and hostile environments such as soccer, you know, at the high levels. So yeah, and I feel like all this, like, especially having a mental schools coach like as yourself, I feel like it should be introduced at the very like at the youth level, because a lot of kids dealing with a lot of things like traumatically growing up and especially playing sports like and their brains aren't really like developed to like deal with anything like, for example, and something I do with growing up, like I don't know what anxiety was like. I would get anxiety during games, but I don't know what it was until like years after, like Oh, that was anxiety. And I feel like we should see a lot more on the youth level. What are great, you know. Again, man, the really good insight right there, and you're exactly right, is, I was just talking to my brother about this other day with children with covid nineteen, is we have to be mindful as parents to observe symptoms, because you're exactly right. Children at the lower age levels, they're not going to come out and say, Huh, I'm anxious right now. I'm strepped. We're all right, they're not going to say that. They don't know. They don't know what it will have the language to wrap around that. So where we look at, you know, headaches, we look at stomach aches, we look at tension, we look at mood swings. You're exactly right, and so, hey man, you're on it. The youth is really important to be able to train the parents, and we've done so at work with parents at the youth level. We've done some training with them, and you're exactly right. And so another thing too, that's really important to be able to recognize that as a child, like when your body's changing a little bit now, that that means like this is what what's going on. But also is if athletes at a young level, meaning like they're eight years old, six years old, all the way up to twelve and thirteen, if they have success early, if they're really good early, that is where mental skills comes in, and it's even more important because that leads some problems to these young kids with the parents and the children. They it's really hard to navigate success at a very young age level with children and what happens, and you know, down the road is there could be a merging of this identity formation. So they think what they are as what they do, and that's bad. As they continue to get better and better, they're going to get up to the high school ranks and the college ranks and someone's going to punch them in the mouth and they're going to fail and they're going to thank Oh my God, I'm a failure because I failed once. They're not used to it, and so there's so there it goes again the importance at the youth level of the psychological implications of these children, and we see a lot of that. We see burn out, we see fixed mindset which which children have such a hard time making mistakes because they have so much uch success early on and they don't know how to navigate it, you know, as children, and so when they get older it becomes a really big problem. So at the youth level it's probably even more important and such a great insight out your part, because we think that this is all about the college level and the elite athletes, but with not that. It's really luck you just said. It's at the lower levels that we really need it and want it. Well, and then I'll say like as far as with the use love youth levels too, if they can pick up a few things and have some kind of a mental skills program when they're, like you said, when they're developing and learning, that can be so helpful. You know, later on I'll mention because I did say at the college level we kind of don't really deal with the parents, but obviously I've been around the youth soccer. I would have to say ever since I've been at Salano I haven't coach club soccer. I just I don't really have to because of and I like to focus on the college program only and I don't like to take the time away and do club and even high school. But my two daughters, for example, went through the whole club system, you know. So so I would you know. Obviously I was around it. I'm around you soccer anyway a little bit, just with recruiting, but obviously the older kids. But so my two daughters went through it and I was there and I know exactly what you're talking about. You have the the pressure from the parents, obviously, as you mentioned, as well the cultural part of it too, because different cultures obviously deal with them to mean most every we know that every country in the world except United States. Their national sport is is football, of soccer. Writer. And you know, like even...

Mexico. I mean, come on, I lived there for a couple of years, so I know that it's like everything right. So you got that cultural maybe parents kind of but the thing. And so you have that going on. And so I was in it a little bit. And Strategy and you sit there and you hear the parents what they're saying. Strategically Right, and they're off a little bit right, some of them, a lot of a lot of bit, a lot of well, they're all off right, but played in some of their dads were professional players in their country whatnot. So I get it. So their kind of so, but but their perspective on what they're trying to with, they're trying to and so they're correct a little. But then there's a lot of parents right to who've never really played, that's never been athletes and and so you hear all that. I was always the parent who at the Games, you had the sideline right here and all the parents were lined up. I mean, if they were any closer they'd be on the field playing with their kids, right, yeah, but I was the one in this way, up in the hill, away from everybody else. I didn't want to hear all that stuff going on and I wanted to disconnect a little bit. I'm not and you know they're. They're telling their kids stuff to do and whatnot, opposite of what the coaches tell him what to do and that kind of stuff. So strategically is there. But I even think, even more importantly so, you have the parents telling them one thing that coaches tell him another thing. In the bad part about is during the game when the Aaron is tell them the stuff different than what the coaches and all this kind of so what a mess. But I even think psych at logically it's even worse because let me give you an example. The car ride home. Yeah, that's what you go after the game, and this is all this is. There's some pretty good work in our area and just in sports psychology and whatnot. Kind of the last thing that one of the player players, of the kids or the kids of the parents want to hear is after the game. And sometimes it's even winner lose. Right, they don't, they don't, they don't want to talk about the game as they're going home and what happened. And you did this and that and more times, and not what I hear. Oh my Gosh, you take a coach and you multiply it by ten. Yeah, and their parents are drilling them in the car, right over them like all you kiss, you should have done that. So how? And that's really a psychologically really kind of kills the whole thing for the kid because they're now they got to listen. Imagine doing that every game and some parents are really, really bad. And the last thing. So my daughters went through all that kind of stuff, and the last one is my younger daughter. My oldest one again played club soccer all the way to the end and didn't decide not to play in college. Well, my youngest daughter decided to play in college and she wanted to play in college, while she just played for Salano for two yards for you pro so I actually was the dad, was the coach, was the whole I had that all of those dynamics going on right, and you can imagine that kids the last person that they want to listen to is their own parents when they're being coached. That's just a it's very interesting phenomena, but it's very common and it's just how it is. They they listen to everybody else, but when you're trying to so that's you have that dynamics going on. So definitely I think that if the mental skills part could actually address some of those things. And I and actually, you know what, even another thing train the parents, hmm as well, because they need to hear some of the stuff we're talking about right now and saying hey, look, you know what, the worst thing you can do is lecture your kid or talk to your kid after they perform, and what you should be really doing is, if they want to talk about it, go ahead and talk about it, but if they don't want to talk about it, and so you know, it's I've heard this before too. It's very funny. Hey do you want to talk about the game on the way home? And they say no, and the parents still going go out. It's that's anyway, just a little bit of perspective and and I'll have to say I'm guilty of that as well as a parent. HMM. But but being that I'm knowledgeable in sportsychology and I know this stuff, I knew when you know, I pretty much let that go and I and the other thing I did as a parent with my kids. I disconnected. I wanted them to learn on their own and learn from the coaches and I didn't want to be in the middle of that. And then they're going to learn good ways and bad ways of doing things and and so I kind of wanted to stay keep that separation. I've always kept that separation. I never coach my kids when they were in Ute Sports. Yeah, I said, Hey, you know what, I love it if they came to the College Level and I'm coaching the college level and I can actually coach them there, that's where I'll coached in. But before then, no, and he has some training here in their individual stuff, but as far as coaching their teams, no, nothing like there, because then it doesn't like a psychological thing to of like who am I going to let down? My coach or my dad, because you have to listen to one of them. So it doesn't find something like that. So it's like, oh, it's crazy and something also for carnal for those listeners. What do you look for in the four different positions, like what do you look for in a keeper? What do you look for in the defender, or live from a midfield, and what he looked for in the forward. For those people listening that are playing high school right now, I want to play for like Salano or the college level. Well, first of all, the way I'd answer that question is when I'm recruiting, I'm looking for soccer players.

So I'm not necessarily recruiting certain positions. First and foremost, I'm looking for soccer players because sometimes, and at the junior college level, we have a little bit more freedom in that area because we're not Stanford where, you know, there were replacing a top forward who's going to be a senior and graduating. They're replacing their top you know, goalkeeper, whatever. At the junior college level it happens a lot where you could have a center back or let me, let me throw it this way. You could have a star forward come in, like goal scorer, led the Hall High School and goal scoring all that kind of stuff, and all sudden they come out for your college team in there you're starting center back and you're like like a lot of transition. What happened there? It's like, okay, well, the team needed that position or the coach sees things differently in terms of what they what position they want to play. So that changes a lot. So first of all, I look for soccer players. You ask the question like what do I look for in each each position? Yeah, I mean, so if you're if you're aside from the goalkeeper, if you're looking at the defenders, if you're looking for the midfields, you're looking for the forward, I'm looking for a mean in best case scenario if I can, because sometimes we have to bring in players that are just available and we don't have scholarshipting like that. So I'm looking for the ball skills. I'm looking for a I'd like players to play out of the back. They can have the skills to play on the back. Obviously, if you're in the center mid I'd like, you know, players can know, they can shoot, they can you know, they can pass, they can control the ball, you know, forwards the same type of thing. So looking at ball skills and being able to and that ties in with our kind of team philosophy is, you know, more of a possession oriented type of a of a team versus a you know, kind of long ball, kind of counter time, you know, pressure and then win the ball back and then skip the midfield and not do that. So I really look for the players that, if I can, hand pick and is more skills and the ball skills and then when they get into the program if they have the more skills. And the other thing too is maybe they can play in more than one positions. If not, definitely that's what the mending multiple especially they can lay multiple positions and because, and I tell them that too when they ask me that question, the same thing you're asking. What do you looking for in the players? Is a well, if you can play more than one position, that's going to help you, because if you come out on our team and we have seven backs and all you can plays back and not going to vendor, you know, versus if you are more versatile and you can also play in the midfield or whatever, if you're a midfield you can play forward or whatnot, then that's going to help you to maybe be a starter or play more. But if you're, you know, only limited to what you can position as you can play. So that's kind of what we look for in the position in the players. Is there? So we want to know is there? Is there? Is there a talent you in Salana? Have you seen her time there? They're always absolutely there's I would say we're in one of the more fortunate areas into in terms of the talent pool in Salano and I one of the more fortunate areas that this area will look at a JAC M it will consider a JAC as an option for their for their kid. There are other areas all use a little more of fluent areas that that's not an option. So that like and there, they want their kids going to go to a four year school. Their parents are driving that and rather they play at whether they play sports or not. So yet there is, there is talent in Slano county area. Our teams over the years has reflected that. We are basically an all star team of Salano area and there's a Vacaville Fairfield we've also so have for a long time and still kind of not as much anymore, but the Napa area as well has provided us very many good players over the years who have really helped our program. And we even go up to almost to Davis like so we're in diction winners and then we get over to the Venetia and sometimes we hoped the bridges and we get some players you know, from over there. What I will say that that kind of hurts this area is although we have the talent in this area. We don't have a high level club in this area. Yeah, that's something I agree with. What if? What I mean by that is you have Davis Legacy, which is kind of in our area, but not so much because it's far enough away and those kids tend to gravitate more towards Sacramento and a lot of them come from Sacramento. And then the other big club that's closest to us is DFC Diablo Valley, which is in conquered okay, so what you have is the Salano county area of kids. What they do is, if they start getting to a level that's maybe out grows, if you will, the vaccavills and the Benicia's and the Salano soccer club. Maybe they're looking for a little bit more competitive experience as a youth, they're going to go to one of those two that I just mentioned. They're going to leave Salano count of area. They're going to go...

...there. So the problem, you know, if it's a problem that you don't have those players developed in those clubs. Like if we had a night, if we had a nice big high level club in Salano County area, those players are going to come to us more developed and I feel like he between even became like water down, aren't if you remember, like when it was it was salona soccer club and now it's Salano united, and then they also have North Bay, which is also in fairface. I feel like he gets watered down, like there's too much like disintegration, like it's not all just one strong thing. It's all like Vacaville united in Vacaville and stuff like that. Yeah, Vacaville. Then you have Venetia and then each one of these small sin even Valleo has a club thing and, like you mentioned, there are three at least right now in Fairfield. So it ends up being watered down, like you said. And then the level, it's all these small clubs trying to operate on their own. And if like a Davis is humongous, I mean they and the DFC. I don't know if you know this, but you have low valley soccer club and DFC. They merged two clubs about five to eight years ago, I can't remember, Jack Win, and then they just merged another one, okay, with with heritage, which is more of a Anioch kind of a club. And so if you they're kind of doing what should be done. So if, if Vacaville and Solano and Venetian, all them kind of got together and just made a club, and that would be so much so we do have the Talon area in our area, but we end up having to develop them more because they don't. They come to US less developed than the other the other clubs do, I mean the other players do. Something that I want to also mention, that's a drive girls want to play for Salana is CEC. CEC, I don't know if a lot of people don't know. CECIS the assistant coach with slannel team. So if she represented the Brazil national team for eleven years, she won the Golden Boot and the nine tonight, nine World Cup Hall of Famer. I feel like a lot of people need to know that. Like Selano Count Salana Community College has a coach that has been at that level. And I want to ask you two of its kind of like two parts. The first part is how did you recruit CC because I don't she was coaching at last Positas and livermore. How did you recruit her? How did you introduce her to the program? And the second part is d have you seen girls recently want to come to this lone because of CC. Well, I really I'm a good recruiter, so that's how I recruited. As it comes down, I actually I used to coach at Las Posidis college years ago. Okay, so I met CC when she first came to this country and when she was first getting started as a coach in this country. I met her because I was part of the last passitis coaching staff. So so I knew CC. And then when CC was done at last posities college, for some reasons and whatnot, because she did coach at she was at junior college. Had Coach before it lost in his college. She did that for ten years part time. Yeah, what I found out about her actually not going to continue on there. I had A to be I had a recommendation from one of my mentors, who I also coach with the last Passidis, that hey, you should bring cc into Salano. She was already doing the junior college thing. It was already part of her lifestyle. She already had experience doing that, and so I immediately contacted her and I said, Hey, I understand that you're not no longer going to be at lost posidis anymore, are you? Interested in coming into this on the college and helping us as an assistant, and so that's kind of how it all started. And then, you know, brought her into Salano and she's been there for this is, I believe, her seventh year, so it's not a new thing. She started. I mean ton you were helping us, she was yeah, when you came out and helped our team a little bit, she was there right. Yeah, so this their seventh year and there's no question that she's a she's a recruit. She helps us to recruit players in the area and definitely having somebody on like her on your staff definitely helps. Not only does she help once you to recruit players into the program, but she can also help retain players because they realize and they have such a good experience working with her. And, oh my gosh, no, you know, not only is she achieved something incredible as a soccer player and you can learn so much from somebody who has been at the highest level, one the best in the world is that, but in terms of if you know CEC, she's a very humble, very humanistic person. Yeah, and so they you know, she's not out there expecting those players to do what she did. You know, she understands a junior college player. She's did it for years and she really understands and she's just a she has that up. She has that skill of her interactions with the players and that's even, probably even, maybe even more of a strength than a coach, that is that she can really relate and so her once players get into the program and retention is obviously helped as well with her being there. I think one of the things that we could always do a better job out, but I try to do a really good job. I was, like you mentioned, hey, letting these players know, hey, we got this person, assistant coach in our program. What a phenomenal...

...opportunity that you can have to work to the with. Not Too many people can say or how that experience and opportunity to work with such a high level athlete, athlete or player. But but in addition to that, now becoming a high level coach as well, and so not too many people have that opportunity and when I go out and talk to the high schools, I I try to share this information I'm sharing with you right now, and it's very interesting because CEC is a little older right she's see Marta's out there right now finishing her career. Right. Well, that was see Marta. That's CC. Basically whatever walk back. Marta is the new CC, if you will. HMM. So the players can relate, relate to them and they can like Carly Lloyd and all that kind of stuff. But when you mentioned CC, most of them never heard of her and they don't know who she is. So you have to educate them. Tell them. Look, yeah, she she did the same thing and she was at this highest level. Yeah, it was twenty years ago that she did it, but she's still one of the best ever and like all the fame and all that. So, like he was sixteen when he started playing for the national team. That's yeah, she was, and then I think she was fourteen when she actually left home to start. That the endeavor as far as getting to the PROWS and get into the national team and all that kind of stuff. So yeah, and then well, something also with Kevin. You've also received training by the Seattle Seahawk psychologist. So how did that help? To having that also that professional perspective to help out with the team to so you have CC. So some played Brazil national team and then Kevin to also receive that mental skills training by the Seattle seahawks. How was that? Like Michael Gervais, he's awesome. We spent Geez. I was down at La all day one day, actually two days, and I think it was an eighthour training session with some other interesting individuals and it was phenomenal. And my I've been in the sports psychology space. My First Class I taught was, what was it? It was in two thousand and two, so I don't know what that is. Eighteen, seventeen years, somewhere in there, and I've been I've been teaching sports psychology, mental performance, working with the athletes ever since then, and then had an opportunity, obviously, to learn from, I feel, one of the best right now. You know someone who's on the world stage and he speaks the same language. That's important too. I think there's a lot of professionals that are consultants in the mental game space or psychologists that are you know they're they're good and they you know they're on it. I think a big piece too, is is there's always an art to it and do they speak the same language? Are they looking at it in a to go back to coach cardinals were humanistic way, looking at the whole person that is Michael Gervei, and so I've been in contact. He's great, he's really accessible and he's been, you know, he's definitely influenced my work and open my eyes to the language. Now that some of the language I use that I knew so well intuitively, now I'm able to use the the language. I think that can resonate, you know, with some of the players. And so, you know, he's awesome. I mean he's really good at what he does. He's done the work, just like these other elite performers. You know, with CC it's we call it tripping over the truth. You know, they ask themselves a tough questions. It's not it's not easy. I mean it work extremely, extremely hard, and so it's had a big impact on me. In fact. To go back, you know, Michael Gervei, I got in contact with him because a while back I went and met with Pete Carroll and when Pete Carroll was at USC and him and money Kiffin and some of these other guys, we ended up spinning about two or three days at USC watching and talking with Pete Carroll and a couple of his death members at some of their spring practices that they have. And so Pete Carroll's philosophy is there what, similar to ours when I was coaching American football. Always Compete. It's attitude is really important. And then Gervais, I guess, came and started working with Pe Carol up north of the sale seahawks, and so I started hearing this guy talk on some kind of interview, this guy named Michael Jervan. I'm thinking, Gosh, that sounds just like pe Carol, you know, and then he had the science and the training behind it and I thought all, this is great, I want to meet that guy. And so, yeah, the long story story went down there and it was great. Yeah, so's he's one of the top guys right now in the space thology. And then also done. I want more people to like pursue like what you're doing. So I know you have which masters prepared you for the role you currently have with the soccer team? Was it the sports exercise science or psychology? Because I know a lot of people may not have be able to get two masters, let alone like a Bachelor's? But which one helped you more for your role for the soccer team? Such...

...a tough question, you know, because I wasn't satisfied, you know, having a doing the training, doing the work in bio mechanics and an exercise physiology. So basically you're learning about the body and the structure and function of the body. And then there's another piece over here, which it is the psychology, is the scientific study of how we think about things, how we behave, how our emotions fit in all that, and so, you know, there's so much of an interface with that that it's really hard to say one's more important than the other. I will say this. I will say this. I think when it comes to sports psychologists or mental health professionals in general, consultants, I think it's really important that you know that person has competed and played. Yeah, I think if you can get if you so, okay. So the training is this. The training is is play as long as you can, you know, and it doesn't mean you need to go to the US Olympics or whatever, but play is long and as much as you possibly can to get that, you know, just that hardcore practical knowledge base. And then, I think this is big right here, the coaching perspective. I spent years coaching, you know, half of my career up to this point, if I cut it in half, was coaching. So now what I do is more, you know, consulting, counseling, and so it's more the consulting sports psychology component. And so what I have seen as individuals that have training in just to psychology and they haven't competed or they haven't really coached. They don't understand certain things. For example, like we were talking about mistakes right. Yeah, to mistakes are freaking hard. Yeah, nobody wants to make money less. I've been there, man, I got touched in the mouth, I lost man, I've failed so many times. And so I think if you have someone that has great theory or at theoretical background. So there's that's good stuff. You know, they have a lot of that. A lot of scholarly research and training US really important. I think that's really important. But if they don't understand the implications of how coaches look at mistakes, because coaches get fired because of the mistakes players. They players have anxiety to pret there's all these things going on with mistakes. We need to understand all those things. Okay, so I think we need to look at it from a humanistic perspective, and so I think understanding, you know, biomechanics, motor development, physiology, which is kinesiology, that is important. So if you can do that at the Undergrad level, that's a good way to start and then, as is you want to continue if you're going to go at a graduate level. I think now, if you have a good background, maybe at the bachelor level of Kinnesesiology or exercise physiology, sports science, they're very similar, then maybe, yeah, they start to go the sports psychology, Welt or or clinical or general psychology route and then the higher you go, the more specialized you know you get. So like I'm getting licensed right now and getting certified and in sports psychology services and so it's very, very fine tuned to athletes and performance and just mental health in general. So I don't know if that made sense, because I guess that pathway that I set out is not for everybody. But you have a little bit of everything. You know, you have some of the UNDERGRAD mechanics, physiology, biomechanics, more learning, and then you have psychology and then you start to specialize, whether you go to PhD or a second masters or license, whatever, you know, whatever might be. Let me just kind of go backwards here again. I'll rewind on something that's important. Let me give you an example of a coach that maybe has a background of psychology but not Kinesiology, and they're coaching or they don't coach but they're trying to teach their kid. Had to had a had at a play baseball and they're trying to teach your kid how to hit. Well, understanding motor development and motor learning support, because you can't just put your kid on a tea for two weeks, you know, two times more to them. It doesn't work that way. When it comes to motor development. You have to have what's called contextual interference. So you need to put them on a tea, then you need to back them up, toss the ball up, then you need to start creating a little pressure we call systematically sensitization. And so there's there's motor pattern development here too, and then that's one piece and then there's a psychological piece over here with how they are perceiving the ball to fly to the ball and how their they're thinking about things. So, as you can see, it is it is pretty complex, and just having one area can really lack in another. Area. So coach, cardinal use the term humanistic and that's exactly what we look at this as the totality of the person, not...

...just one one aspect. Okay, so there's there's a lot to them. Yeah, let me let me add a little bit to that. First of all, start off with with with Kevin mentioned in regards to there's maybe mid many mental consultants or sports psychologists out there working, and not to say that they can't do a good job and be very good, but it will help them that they did compete, right, they were an athlete, and so they can relate to the athlete. That's very important and, like I said, it doesn't mean that it's a it's a requirement or it has to be that way, but definitely can help. The other thing I want to say in regards to what marks mentioned is the coaching experience, right. So they, if they're doing mental skills work, like maybe marks is doing right now in their mental skills consult mental skills high performance, coach. They've coached also before. So they don weren't just an athlete, but they coach. And here's the other aspect of it that I think is very important as well because of in mark situation because he coached and also, more specifically, he coached at the junior college level. He knows what US coaches are going through and that's very important because, and it coaching at any level, but at the junior college level it's very unique. He understands all the roles that we have to play. Were always going we know so. So his insight into that, because he's had that coaching experience, is important. I think his and I don't want to speak for a coach Barts, but his. So he had a mentioned, obviously as a Master's in the biomechanics exercise phys area, which is more the physical part, but then he went back and got a degree in psychology, which he's always been interested in sports psychology. But getting that second masses in psychology, I'm sure, gave him a lot more knowledge to work with than most people have if they just have a kinesiology to degree, because now they're more specifically in a psychology and dealing and learn with things that you probably would never even cover in a kinesiology just because it's so limited. I will say too, for those out there, coach Mars has a sports psychology class at Salano that he offers. That could be something that if somebody's interested in the mental skills, they're interested in being a sports I coologist, they can take that class to get a little taste of the junior college level. Hey, what is what is sports psychology? What the heck is it? You know what's going on there and that could be an opportunity for somebody to to kind of maybe get introduced to that and see if they like it. It's a that sports psychology class is an introductory class at Salano and then the other the last thing I'll say is I teach the intro to kinesiology class at Salano and, like coach March was mentioning, if somebody's interested in going into let's say sport, this sport field or they're interested in going into the mental maybe being a high performance coach or maybe being a mental skills coach along those ways. That's where you want to go. As you want to get a kinesiology degree and you're going to hit and then you can, once you get farther into that program you can start focusing in on. Okay, well, maybe when you go for that general kindnesiology degree you find out that that the mental sports psychology is what you're interested in, then you can start focusing in more onto that as you finish your bachelor's right and then it's as you enter more advanced degrees like a master's you can focus in on that that stuff. I would probably say for me, and I don't know if coach marks agrees with this or not, but I would say for me it's probably a better approach to do the kinnesiology route if you're going to go into the high performance mental skills thing and athletics, versus the psychology route. But then again he might have some different paid of the insight into that too, but you have but you can start general and the Nice thing about if those out there listening, if they want to get a kinnesiology degree, they can. They decide later that well, maybe the sports psychology wasn't the area that they wanted to go into. They could. They still have all the other areas and in Kinnesiology they can look into going into so they're still getting that that kind of major and then the start of that too is the class that I teach, which is the introd of Kinnesiology, which really gives all the students the information on all the careers that you could possibly do in this field. So a little bit of addition to the ones that are out there that are maybe looking at some kind of a career in the mental skills or the high performance or or sports psychology. There's would be like a lot more attention towards the Solano soccer team, for definitely, because I feel like even in my perspective I went, like I did journalism slano and I feel like it wasn't really like covered like I did like the sports broadcasting, but there wasn't really much emphasis. I was the one who kind of pushed to like say like Oh, I wanted to work with the girls talk team, and I was like the only ones. I feel like this would be something that's we push a lot more Asalana, from my perspective, from the journalism perspective, yeah, or for the sports broadcasting as well, yea, for this one maybe. Yeah, that you know, it's been interesting over the years because, you know, pop has had that sports broadcasting program there now Salano and they...

...do some of the basketball, volleyball whatnot. Some of it is just to depend on what kind of students he has and who wants to cover what, and that kind of stuff and maybe indoors being a little leaser to cover. But but it I would have liked to see maybe a little bit more of the soccer games maybe being covered and like like the have the rest of the sports and that kind of stuff. But you know, if the kind of is what is we get. He's been providing filmers for us for to help us with our own like you you know, to help us with people in his classes that can help us film the Games, which is important for for teaching the athletes. I think one of the things that all say kind of enclosing, at least for me. I do know this, like there might be some other programs out there, like at the junior college level and the mental skills high performance what we're doing. There might be some out there. I personally and coach marks May, but I don't really know if many of them out there. So we're one of the only sports at the junior college level, not just in soccer but just in all the sports who is who is doing a mental skills program yeah, for the Athletes Way we're doing it with and they actually take a class in addition to their athletics type stuff. It's another athletics class, but it's specifically they're getting units for working on their mental skills. So we have that that going and now, since then, now there are other sports at Salano who are jumping on board and who are also doing the mental skills how soccer started off. But, like I mentioned, like I said, in the junior college level, it's very unique. It's it's cutting edge, state of the art stuff that that is going on right now. That and, like I mentioned before, it is it is the biggest thing right now going on in sports, in addition to, you know, the mental skills and in like I said, it's kind of cool that we're doing this and, you know, I think it's the future. It can expand to other junior colleges and, like I said, it's pretty unique in our in what we're doing at Salano. And then, like I said, we started in soccer but now kind of expanding a little bit more. Some of the other coaches at Salanto or are seeing maybe they should try to do that with their athletes and then, who knows, maybe moving on in the future some other junior college is kind of see the value and doing that as well. Cardinal and marks, thank you guys. Thank you. Thank you, guys the good work. Thank you, good job.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (30)